Fayette school board 6.18

Written by David Green.


The Fayette Athletic Boosters are ready to help, but they’re looking for some direction on where to begin.

Gorham-Fayette Board of Education members made a decision Monday that will get the booster group off to good start.

“We’ve started thinking about the new athletic fields and we’ve started some fund-raising,” said Boosters member Sarah Schrock, “but we have no idea what you need.”

Schrock and three other representatives told the board their organization is willing to assist.

“We’d just like to get started somehow, in some way,” she said.

Schrock noted that the Boosters wouldn’t be able to cover all costs. An all-weather track alone could cost at least $250,000.

Lesley Fruchey suggested that facilities development could be arranged in phases, with a dollar amount set for each step of the way. This would give the public a clear picture of what’s ahead and show incremental progress.

Superintendent Russell Griggs suggested that a design firm should be hired to create an initial layout, giving everyone involved a common idea of where the project is heading.

Griggs recommended going with professional designers to avoid problems he’s seen in other districts. Someone with experience can bring in all the necessary factors, such as drainage, topography, placement of concessions and rest rooms, bleacher needs, etc.

Board members decided to stay with the Buehrer Group, the architectural firm handling the school construction.

LIBRARIAN—With the announcement of Joyce Koppenhoffer’s retirement, the district will be without a librarian/media center director.

Griggs said he would like to post the job as part-time and check with other districts about sharing a librarian. An aide would be employed when the librarian was not available. Griggs also intends to speak with the Normal Memorial Library staff about cooperative efforts.

In another hiring issue, Griggs spoke of the difficulty of finding someone who is certified in both physical education and health.

FOOD SERVICE—Board members approved a transfer of $6,455 from the general fund to the food service fund to cover a shortfall of cash through the end of the fiscal year. A total of of $22,000 is needed to cover costs through the start of the new school year.

Board members expressed concern about the fund finishing in the red.

Griggs said that food service operates as a business and needs to finish in the black. It will have to become more efficient.

The new school will bring several changes to food service, he said. The start of the closed campus lunch policy will likely lead to more meals served. New, central facilities should also have a positive impact on revenue. In addition, lunch prices are increasing by five cents.

The new point-of-sale cafeteria system will provide information about what students are buying and what they’re passing by.

 Griggs said that data will be collected during the first semester of the coming school year and adjustments can then follow in the second semester.

MISC.—A $1,000 donation from John Winzeler was accepted. A transfer of $693 was approved from the Class of 2008 fund to the Class of 2010.

An agreement with Brumbaugh Herrick, Inc., for asbestos consulting was approved at a cost of $2,700.

Student policy changes, in addition to the closed campus, include forbidding the use of cellular telephones during school hours and the use skateboards and Heely shoes on school property.

  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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