Fayette residents address underage drinking 5.14

Written by David Green.

Fayette Residents do Their Part to Tackle Underage Drinking


Two Fayette parents recently took to the streets to spread the word about the problem of underage drinking.

Sisters-in-law Pam Seiler and Chris Seiler delivered materials to businesses and agencies in the community designed to inform local citizens about the problem of underage drinking.

Materials promoting the “Parents Who Host, Lose the Most” campaign includes information about Fulton County underage drinking statistics; the irreversible damaging effects of alcohol on the teenage brain; and tips for how parents can help their kids stay away from alcohol.

As a parent of a high school junior, Chris Seiler was also involved in Gorham Fayette High School’s after-prom planning efforts this year to provide alcohol-free activities to the students.

Pam Seiler works as a licensed social worker at the Fulton County Opportunity School and has seen some of the negative consequences suffered by students and families due to underage drinking.

“Because teenage alcohol consumption is a huge problem in today’s society, I believe that ‘Parents Who Host Lose the Most’ will have a definite impact in Fulton County,” she said.

Gorham Fayette High School students Brittany Seiler (daughter of Chris Seiler) and Ben Kovar created and recorded radio ads which are being aired on WMTR. Students from each of the six other high schools in Fulton County also produced and recorded radio ads. With the assistance of Fayette principal Dan Feasal, tips for hosting alcohol-free parties and information about the dangers of underage drinking will soon be mailed to the parents of FHS students. 

“Parents Who Host, Lose the Most” is a program of the Drug Free Action Alliance in Columbus. The public awareness campaign is designed to educate parents about the health risks of underage drinking and the legal consequences of providing alcohol to youths. Its main message is that underage drinking is unhealthy, unsafe and unacceptable. Although the campaign message applies year-round, it is especially important during prom and graduation season.

The campaign is sponsored locally by the Fulton County Family and Children First Council and Youth Partnership, a group of individuals concerned about underage drinking in Fulton County. After reviewing statistics related to underage drinking in Fulton County, the Family and Children First Council identified underage drinking as its top priority.

 “Scientific research shows the serious and damaging effects of alcohol on the still-developing brain of youth under the age of 21,” said Mike Oricko, Fulton County Health Commissioner. “We hope the campaign helps people better understand that underage drinking is not harmless. It is no longer enough to say, ‘Don’t drink and drive.’ There are many serious dangers associated with underage drinking.”

Winston Hatcliff, pastor of the Fayette Church of the Nazarene, regularly attends  the monthly Youth Partnership meetings. He has also contributed his time and efforts to the “Parents Who Host, Lose the Most” campaign by helping distribute yard signs and a banner and asking mayor Anita VanZile and the Fayette Village Council to adopt a proclamation declaring April as “Parents Who Host, Lose the Most” month.

In addition to the village council, the Fulton County Commissioners have also adopted a proclamation.

A major feature of the campaign includes increased efforts by local law enforcement to reduce underage drinking. A grant will pay for the Fulton County Sheriff’s Department to increase “party patrols” during prom and graduation season. The Ohio Investigative Unit will also conduct compliance checks at retail businesses with a liquor license in Fulton County, to ensure that alcohol is not sold to customers under the age of 21.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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