The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Jonathan Wood waiting for new liver 3.19

Written by David Green.

For someone on the waiting list for a donated liver, Jonathan Wood thinks he’s in a pretty good position.

To get there has come at a price, however, and friends of his family have organized a fund-raiser March 29 to help bring in needed cash.

Jonathan, 42, grew up in the Hanover-Horton area and now lives near Oak Shade.

He’s a veteran of the first Gulf War and served in the U.S. Army from 1984 to 1992. While stationed in Germany in the late 1980s, he was in an automobile accident that required a blood transfusion.

That incident might be the cause of the Hepatitis C infection he developed, or it might have evolved from his work in a hospital emergency room in the early 1990s.

Hepatitis C can take up to 20 years to develop, and when it does, cirrhosis is usually the result.

Jonathan was diagnosed with cirrhosis a year ago and due to the progression of the disease, he was told by doctors that a transplant was needed.

There was more to his problems than that. He also learned that he suffers from the genetic blood disease hemochromatosis—a condition in which the body retains too much iron and this leads to poisoning.

“Apparently he’s had it all his life but never knew it,” said Jonathan’s wife, Michelle. “It can last a lifetime and never affect you.”

The cirrhosis brought the iron condition to the forefront and hemochromatosis contributed to the deterioration of his liver.

Working with doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, Jonathan was placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) list and awaits his turn for a transplant.

As his conditioned worsened, Jonathan found that his work as a computer programmer was hampered. He started working from home, but in September, he could no longer work on multiple projects.

By November, he was down to just a single project and had to quit his job. His health insurance coverage ended Dec. 31, but when the clinic learned of that situation, Jonathan was removed from the waiting list.

The Woods were forced to keep their insurance active by paying $1,000 a month through the federal COBRA plan.

Jonathan’s A-B blood type is giving him an advantage with the UNOS list.

“This makes his chances much better because it’s a rare blood type,” Michelle explained.

In the Michigan-Indiana-Ohio region, only seven people with A-B blodd are on the list for a liver. The ranking system places Jonathan either first or second.

If he had type A blood, he would be on a list with 600 others.

The first step is to obtain a successful transplant, then get rid of the hepatitis. The hemochromatosis is there to stay, but will be controlled with medication. Jonathan will also be required to have two pints of blood withdrawn twice a month to force his body to produce new blood...

 

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