School bond projects 2.27

Written by David Green.

Griffith pointed to a problem with the elementary school water line as a sample of needs that can’t be neglected. The district paid top dollar for emergency repairs last year, he said, rather than fixing the problem so it won’t happen again.

Other needs include—

Elementary school: Replacement of cracking tile held in place by asbestos adhesive; installing energy efficient windows in the gymnasium; replacing exterior doors that are showing corrosion; replacing corroded plumbing; replacing aging toilet fixtures; repairing areas of the roof; paving the front circle drive.

High school: Addressing mechanical issues with the bleachers; replacing exterior gymnasium doors where corrosion has resulted in rotten wood on the gym floor due to water damage; sanding and refinished the gym floor; replacing several exterior doors due to corrosion; replacing the water pressure tank; replacing shower fixtures in locker rooms.

The middle school bond called for construction of a multi-purpose building for alternative education, physical education, wrestling practice and storage. The structure is completed, but still isn’t in use due to a shortage of funds to finish the interior.

District-wide: The running track has exceeded its estimated life span, but it continues to deteriorate. Nearly 70 cracks  break up the surface, in addition to several areas where the rubber surface is missing. Time and money is spent every year patching the surface in an effort to prevent injuries. The bond would cover the cost of a new track. With a properly laid foundation, only the top surface would need to be replaced in the future. The facility is used frequently by district residents, as well as for athletic events and physical education class.

Griffith said that more than $20,000 is spent annually on a variety of upgrades and maintenance for computers, software, internet service, etc. Bond money would pay for new technology equipment, proper wiring and maintenance of the existing equipment.

“What we have and how we apply it is adequate,” Griffith said, “but it always needs updating.”

New funds would also cover instructional needs such as smartboards, projectors and increased long-distance learning opportunities.

The board will also explore energy-saving initiatives and perhaps take what Griffith calls some simple steps to make the district a shade of “green”—both for cost savings and for student involvement.

“We won’t approach it just because it’s trendy,” Griffith said. “It has to make financial sense.”

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016