2006.03.08 Obituaries offer entertainment

Written by David Green.

“Someone lost their squirting rose

There’s his red nose on the ground

No one’s seen his painted smile,

He’s been gone for quite a while

Something bad happened to a clown.”

                        -Warren Zevon


I suppose I could really use another hobby, considering that I seem to be spending a lot of time scanning through obituaries of strangers lately. Since some newspapers (not this one) started the practice of charging for obits and running whatever the funeral home submitted, some rather odd ones appear at times.

For instance, few people seem to merely pass away or die anymore. Most paid obits now have some fancy way of describing it. My favorites are the ones that say Mr. or Mrs. Whoever “went to be with the Lord.” I always wonder if they really died, or are they just visiting? Do you think maybe He will send them back when He gets tired of them?

The hobbies and pastimes are getting stranger, too. Obits used to be full of people who were avid golfers, avid hunters, and so on. Now we have (and I’m changing the names) Bob, who watched Adam Sandler movies; Jim, who enjoyed eating bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwiches; Leah, who was an extreme fan of strawberries; and Don, who had a taste for Skittles.

There’s also Lori, who liked reading romance novels while sipping tea, and Pam, who was known for “sharing her bakery skills in the form of superb chocolate chip cookies, brownies, cinnamon rolls and icebox dessert.”

I also enjoyed learning the fact that “Michelle’s” favorite Joyce Meyer quotation is, ‘Is your fruit being squeezed?’” And don’t forget, “God needed a good laugh, that’s why he took ‘Henry.’”

And then there was the somewhat sad case of “Carol,” whose obit stated that “She was a very giving person who always did for her family and others but it was not reciprocated.” The obit continues on with the normal listing of survivors, just so there’s no doubt as to who the ungrateful ones are.

But the strangest obit of all time, as far as I’m concerned, belonged to a Toledo woman who passed away back in 2004. Never have I seen such a collection of unknown words, odd phrases and self-congratulations in such a small space. I’ll call the person “Betty.”

First we learn that her “distinctive articulation and fastidious appearance hallmarked her style.”  That’s bragging a bit, I guess, but not that bad.

Two paragraphs later, though, we discover that she “embodied eurythmy and embraced hospitality, harmony, respect and nourishment for body and soul.” My dictionary doesn’t include eurythmy, but I suspect it’s a misspelled form of eurhythmics (not related to the Dave Stewart/Annie Lennox singing duo of almost the same name). Simply put, Betty was supposedly graceful.

Also, her “erudition and avocations developed through avid reading, a penchant for listening, a connoisseurship of the arts, dance, music and food, concern for humanity, unwavering commitment to civility and belief in a transcendent spirituality of a universal pneuma touching every sentient being.” I guess if I’m ever challenged to use the words erudition, penchant, connoisseurship, pneuma and sentient all in one sentence, I’ll now know what to say, even though I can’t find the word “pneuma” in my dictionary, either.

But wait, there’s more. Betty “assiduously cultivated her relationships” and her “greatest achievements and most universally-recognized strengths were her ebullience, aplomb and dignity.” Well, that’s nice to know.

Finally, there was her “sang-froid in the face of the contumely.” Dumbing it down to college graduate language (after some research),  I think that Betty was not easily humiliated. Why couldn’t the obit just say that?

Betty had no visitation prior to a graveside service, possibly to allow mourners an extra day or two to attempt to decipher her obit. In lieu of flowers, I’m hoping her friends all donated a really big dictionary and thesaurus to the library of their choice in her memory. I’m sure that would be what the universal pneuma would consider the contumely thing to do.

– March 8, 2006 
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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