A few facts aboout Poison Ivy 7.25

Written by David Green.

Poison ivy might be considered the bad boy of the cashew family. Mangoes, pistachios, cashews—and poison ivy.

It’s generally identified through a pair of aphorisms: Leaves of three, let it be; Berries white, poisonous sight.

Reaction to poison ivy can be a tricky thing. Some people develop an immunity over the years. Others are never bothered by the plant until they’re adults. Some people are greatly affected as children, then have only a mild reaction as adults.

The Cures

Calamine lotion? Forget it. It only makes you look weird.

There’s a large list of cures—some tried and true, others a little questionable.

Actually, your body is likely to “cure” the problem on its own as the inflammation runs its course. The trick is to make it through that period with the least discomfort, without the urge to itch.

• Heat—Run very hot water over the blisters to make the itching go away, or use a hair dryer, taking care not to burn yourself. Similarly, stand in a hot shower and let the heat work on the afflicted areas.

• Cold—Some favor the opposite approach by rubbing the area with an ice cube.

• Bleach—Are you kidding? I know a doctor who still swears by it. Others warn blood poisoning could follow this approach.

• Baking soda—The body is sending white blood cells to attack the infection, but there’s actually no infection present. Try a baking soda paste on the blisters to help dry out the skin.

• Clearasil—Acne medications contain chemicals to dry out the skin. The faster new skin grows up from below, the quicker the rash is gone.

• Oatmeal—Boil up oatmeal, let it cool some, then apply to the rash for relief. A little baking soda can be added.

• Vinegar—If you don’t mind the odor, vinegar is said to bring a quick relief.

• Banana peels—Never tried this one, but why not give it whirl? Rub the inside of a banana peel on the rash. This one comes with very high recommendations.

 

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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