The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Moving Cross Country: Walking evangelist spreads Christian message

Written by David Green.

By BRAD WHITEHOUSE

When Bob Hanus, Jr., says he has a cross to bear, he means it.

His is fitted with a wheel at the bottom, has a pair of nylon bags strapped along the shank, and says “Jesus loves you” on the side.cross_1

Despite full sun and temperatures in the 90s, Hanus hung the 70-pound wooden cross over his shoulder last Thursday and rolled it west on U.S. 20 toward Fayette. He waved and smiled at every car and truck that barreled by, and, if given the chance, he shared his message.

“The sole purpose I’m carrying this cross is to remind people that Jesus loves them,” Hanus said.

Hanus, who is in his late 30s, was a cocaine addict and an alcoholic until he became a Christian in 1987. For the past nine years, he’s been walking around sharing how his life has changed.

“I call it the one-step program: I repented, and Jesus set me free.”

He’s traveled more than 12,000 miles so far, including parts of Canada and Mexico, and every state except Hawaii.

Lake Geneva, Wis., used to be home for the walking evangelist, but now he lives in a motor home with his wife, Cori, and his 5-year old  son, Timothy.

“Right now, my wife is parked at the Fulton County Fairgrounds, but we stay at a lot of Wal-Marts, because they allow RV parking,” he said.

The family is currently traveling coast to coast on U.S. 20, from Boston, Mass., to Newport, Ore. During breaks from the walk, he attends events such as youth rallies, the NASCAR Winston Cup race in Daytona, even KKK rallies.

“I see the cross as an evangelism tool,” he says. “This is actually my smallest one. I have a bigger one that is outlined with rope lighting that I use at motorcycle rallies.”

 This leg of the U.S. 20 trip stretches from Toledo to Chicago, and has already provided an opportunity to reach out to someone.

“I met a guy in Toledo who was wearing a satanic pentagram around his neck. I was able to pray with him, and he repented and took the pentagram off.”

Based on his own life, Hanus believes that it only takes a moment for God to change someone. He recalls his partying days when he was at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and how his drinking buddy convinced him to try cocaine. He was soon supporting an addiction that cost in excess of $35,000 a year. He almost died of an overdose, and crashed his Firebird into an oak tree at 70 mph.

Then when a group of Christian businessmen scheduled a religious meeting at the Hilton in Lake Geneva, on June 18, 1987, his mother asked him to go. At the meeting, Hanus prayed to accept Jesus as his savior and became a Christian.

Things have never been the same since, and he says that he and his wife now have the best job possible, “telling others about Jesus on a full time basis.” Funding for the ministry comes from voluntary donations, which he believes is a result of God’s provision.

To Hanus, this provision comes in big and small ways. On a day like today, it’s important to stay hydrated, and while that’s not a problem at this particular moment—he’s standing beside the artesian well just a few miles west of the Twin Curves—he believes God is watching out for him.

“You’d be surprised at how many people stop and give me water,” he said.

• Learn more about Bob Hanus and his travels at www.crosswalker.com.

    – July 10, 2002 

 

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