The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Remarkable Rehab: Rupp/Wilson house refurbished

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Grasp the handle inside the front door. That’s enough right there to let you know this is no ordinary apartment house.

It probably doesn’t take close-up views of the architectural details. Just stand back on the sidewalk and take it all in.

The old Rupp House on Main Street was far from tip-top shape when Randy Roberts of Adrian decided to buy the property and fix it up.rupphouse

He made another decision that isn’t commonly seen in rehab projects: He wanted the stately house to appear as much as possible as it did 70 years ago.

“We tried to maintain the historical nature,” Randy said, “but we also tried to maintain functionality for today’s living.”

When Lorene (Rupp) Whitehouse was growing up in that house in the 1930s, she probably wouldn’t have complained for a second about the modern kitchen appliances now installed.

She’s both pleased and relieved that the rehabilitation is preserving a large part of the home’s original details.

Randy’s business, Washovia Fire Restoration Services, tackles a major renovation project each year and the Rupp house provided an ample challenge.

The front steps were in such poor repair that mail delivery people refused to climb them. Randy’s crew duplicated the original look of the steps and porch, including refinishing the decorative half-circle grates at the bottom of the porch.

Walls were insulated and the exterior painted the same yellow as it was in the 1930s.

A laundry room had been fashioned on the back porch, but that’s now reopened as it used to be.

A new stairway entrance to the upper apartments was built along the west exterior. After the wood ages a year, the decorative spindles will be painted.rupphousedine

Behind the double doors on the front porch is the main floor two-bedroom apartment, complete with newly sanded hardwood floors, the original built-in bookcases and detailed woodwork, plus a fireplace with large mantel. Some of the original pocket doors remain.

Upstairs, apartment #2 is the smallest, but it’s not small. Like each apartment in the house, there are windows everywhere.

Apartment #3 is in the front of the house, with a hallway down the middle. On the right is a large kitchen; on the left a living area, and in the middle, a door leading to the porch roof with a small area to stand in the sun and get some fresh air.

Another stairway leads to apartment #4 on the third floor. It’s a large open area with three huge closets under the slope of the room and a dormer window to the east.

From all four sides of the upper story, commanding views of the city are offered.

Although the house served as a private home when Lorene’s family owned it, even then some rooms were rented.

In the 1930s, she said, U.S. 20 was closed for rebuilding and traffic was routed through Morenci. Her mother and two other ladies decided to open their houses as “tourist homes.” They each placed a sign in the front yard and the Rupp house was known as Sterling Palace.

Later, teachers and traveling salesmen rented rooms.

“This house had a lot of character,” Randy said, and he wants area residents to satisfy their curiosity and come take a look inside.

An open house is planned from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday before any tenants move in.

    -April 25, 2007 

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