The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Psychic talks about her own skepticism 2012.10.24

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

janet.almThere's been plenty of doubt in Janet Alm's mind during her growth as a psychic medium.

"I absolutely doubt myself," she told an audience of 30 people Saturday afternoon at Stair Public Library. "I come from an academic background."

After four college degrees, including a doctorate, she developed skepticism in the realm of what she calls "woo-woo stuff."

"I love that term for just unexplainable things," she said. "It acknowledges that it's out there, and hard to believe and understand. It's kind of joking, but it's also some pretty wonderful stuff."

Alm spoke about how it all started for her nine and half a years ago at her summer home on Cape Cod. Her husband was asleep and she was restless with a "jiggly" feeling inside.

Up until that point, she said, the woo-woo stuff—visits from dead relatives, communicating with spirits—was something she considered interesting but certainly not part of her own life.

She worked into the night for a while, felt tired and laid down in hopes of calming her mind. An image came to mind like a little video that she decided must have come from her mother who died four years earlier. 

"This went on for several days," she said, "with sweet little things popping into my mind."

Several months passed before anything verbal came into her head. Some messages were quite clear to her; others were more convoluted.

At one time her mother asked her to go to Indiana and lay her hands on her father's war wounds to relieve him of his pain. That was going too far. Alm had no interest in that sort of thing.

But then she started feeling a buzzing in her hands and decided that must be evidence of what her mother wanted. She went to see her father and told him that she "seemed to be getting messages from Mom."

She told him what she was asked to do and her father confirmed that that was the location of his discomfort. Her father went along with the idea and they decided to give it a try after church the next day.

Then came another message that night from her mother: “Invite the pastor to be present, and do it at 2 p.m."

Alm really wanted nothing to do with having the family pastor present, but they asked him and he agreed. 

He came over at 2 p.m., said a prayer, and Alm touched her father where directed.

"I thought it was a little crazy," she said, "but I could feel the energy."

She felt a little embarrassed by the episode, and besides, her father hadn’t had any pain that day. There was no sudden exclamation that the pain was now gone. However, she asked him about it recently and he says the problem is gone.

Her mother sent a message saying Alm could communicate with other departed people so she practiced with some friends. She soon learned to ask for identifiers—something to provide a positive connection between the client and the spirit.

"The better you know someone, the harder it is," Alm said.

When you know a lot about someone, you doubt the images you receive because you think it's something you already know rather than a message from somewhere else.

"The hardest thing," she said, "is that messages look and sound exactly like your imagination. You don't recognize that it's coming from somewhere else. That's a huge stumbling block to get over."

Sometimes what she tells people makes no sense and she admits there are times when it really is her imagination at work. However, she's getting much more comfortable with her abilities and trusting herself more often.

Alm told several anecdotes from her experiences with psychic readings, mentioning that the identifiers are often very interesting. For example, she once had an image of a totem pole and learned the subject had one in his yard. Many more stories are told in her book, "Woo-Woo: Becoming a psychic at 50." The book is available at Stair Public Library. All of the copies she brought to the library for sale were purchased.

"Every reading I've ever done has been so loving," Alm said. "I've never had a frightening message or I wouldn't be doing it."

After learning about other mediums who claim to communicate with animals, Alm decided to give it a try with her dog, Jock. She sat down beside him one day and asked what he does all day while she's at work serving as director of libraries at Kalamazoo Valley Community College.

“And the next thing that popped into my   mind, in word, a whole sentence was, ‘I  sleep on all the beds.’ It was such a surprise. Jock would not get on a bed if I begged him to.”

She was amused enough to walk into the guest room and sure enough, there was an indentation next to the pillow on each bed.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016