The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Eye-opening experience in Oklahoma City 2012.08.08

Written by David Green.

OK groupBy DAVID GREEN

Shannon Jarrell knows that in the future she’s going to think twice before forming an opinion about someone.

That new attitude is something she brought home from a mission trip to Oklahoma City when nine members of the Morenci Church of the Nazarene youth group went to work with the homeless.

“The thing that got me the most,” said Brooke Baumgartner, “is how much we judge homeless people. Really they’re the same as us, but they have so much less.”

Possessions were in the minds of everyone when they returned home to Morenci.

Danny Hunt put it in simple terms: “I have stuff; they don’t.”

The Oklahoma City visit was nothing new to Nazarene youth pastor Dillan Ketcham. It’s a trip he’s taken before.

“I went on that trip when I was 14 years old, 10 years ago,” said the Indiana native.

OK cleaningHe knew a 10-day excursion would be reasonably priced—sleep in a host church and cook your own food—and he knew the Morenci kids would have a big-city experience they may otherwise never have.

Planning for the trip started in November and fund-raising projects got underway in January. It was finally time to board the church bus last month for the long drive to Oklahoma.

The kids got their first taste of another world on their initial work experience—cleaning out a pair of transitional houses. The homes once served as halfway houses for recovering drug addicts, but the structures had fallen into disrepair and  were used  by homeless people. With new shelter arranged for homeless individuals, two houses were cleaned out by the Morenci youths. Other groups would arrive later to tear out carpet and begin renovation.

“They were just horrid,” Dillan said, and it was an experience that stuck with everyone even after their return. “It took a while before I stopped looking around for cockroaches on the walls.”

“There’s no way to even describe it,” Korin Baumgartner said. 

Chloe Molitierno talked about finding a two-foot tall crawl space with a make-shift bed inside. The kids were staring poverty in the face.

Even as the contents of the homes were taken to the curb, neighborhood residents were looking through the trash to find something useful.

It was disgusting work, Dillan said, but the kids pitched right in and got the job done. They didn’t need to be told what to do.

“They wanted to be there and they wanted to help,” he said. “I was very impressed with our group.”

On the second day, the volunteers helped arrange food and supplies in a large warehouse owned by Love Link Ministries—the organization that oversees visiting youth groups.

The following day Morenci’s kids had their first contact with homeless people when they served meals at the Compassion Center and at the First Indian Church of the Nazarene.

The youths unloaded 9,000 pounds of food and sorted items to be taken to a thrift store that helps fund the food program.

“The most eye-opening day for me was the day we visited the homeless camps,” Gabi Acuña said. 

A local guide took the kids through abandoned industrial property and along a path into a woods to a collection of makeshift shelters.

“Seeing people living in ‘tents’ propped up against trees was very moving,” Gabi said. “It showed me a side of poverty I’d never seen before.”

Contact with homeless individuals brought out some interesting stories. Generally it was a tale of drug and alcohol addiction, but that wasn’t always the case. A few were born into homelessness—there were even some third generation cases—and some were leading normal lives until “the event” arrived. Loss of job, loss of home, mental or physical illness, injury, divorce—the reasons are varied.

“I have never experienced people in such distress before,” Gabi said. “It was hard to witness.”

“I think most of them want to change themselves and improve their lives. They don’t like the situations they’re in.” Shannon said. “If they stick with God and keep going to church....”

Dillan thinks many people will escape from homelessness. There are plenty of success stories, he said, people who have been helped through the church.

The trip made such an impact that Korin said she felt as though she was experiencing culture shock when she returned.

“I’m just thankful to have a roof over my head and a bed to sleep in,” Bladen Mellon said. 

Shannon thought about the people she left behind when she went shopping with her mother on the day she returned home.

“Here we are buying all this stuff and half of these people don’t even have a dollar,” she said.

“We stress out over things like getting the laundry done,” Dillan said. “They just want something to cover themselves with. It’s two different worlds and it makes ours seem a lot more petty.”

We hear about people starving in Africa or China, Shannon said, but it’s also right here in America.

“The hardest part about leaving was knowing we still had so much to do,” Korin said. “We planted a lot of seeds.”

The experience was something everyone should have at least once, the kids agreed, and they would certainly do it again. However, the kids also talked about what they might do at home.

“There is so much we could do here, as well,” Gabi said. “For example, opening a thrift store, expanding our food pantry, or even having community dinners.”

There’s certainly a lot her generation takes for granted, she said, but at least for now, these youngsters are thinking more about what they have.

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