Give me some static...for the county fair 2012.07.25

Written by David Green.

fair.edwardBy DAVID GREEN

When people think about 4-H county fair projects, steers, hogs, sheep and chickens often come to mind. That’s not the case for Edward Hollstein of the State Line Hustlers.

Edward takes a different approach to fair competitions. He heads to the kitchen to create award-winning apple pie.

Edward entered an apple pie again this year in the 4-H static competition, but he also branched out to give jams a try. He turned in jars of strawberry and black raspberry, but he thinks his apricot is the best.

In his first year with 4-H—two county fairs ago—Edward’s pie won a blue ribbon and his bird house took a red ribbon. He entered only food competition this year, but he hopes to submit something in addition to food next summer.

“I’ll take an apple pie and some jam,” he said, “and hopefully I’ll make something out of wood or metal.”

His sister, Mary Margaret, entered a painting last year and won Extra Special Honors. She took another one over this year, and, although it was something she liked, it didn’t garner an award from judges.

Briana Green of the Medina Pioneers took a different direction this year and entered an essay about the culture of the Cherokee Native Americans.

fair.lauren flowersThis year marks the first time State Line Hustler Lauren Taylor brought an animal to the fair, but she remained active in static projects.

In the past she’s competed in rockets, crocheting, photography and sewing. She won Extra Special Honors last year with a floriculture project, and she repeated that this year using an old tool box for a container garden.

Lauren also worked with her grandfather, Paul Taylor, to create her name out of bolts, U-clamps and other pieces of metal. 

Her third entry was a wooden treasure box bank made from a kit.

Now in her fourth year of 4-H after Cloverbuds, Lauren decided it was time to give animals a try and she raised hogs in an old barn on the family’s property in Munson.

She’s delighted to be using the tack box and cane that her father, Joey, used when he was in 4-H many years ago.

Taylor and Carolyn Gould created a variety of static projects for the fair. For Carolyn, it’s only her second year as a Cloverbud.

She and Taylor both made American flags out of craft supplies and they both made wreaths from plastic sandwich bags and a bow.

The girls also tried their cooking skills—Rollo Delight cookies for Carolyn and pumpkin chocolate chip cookies for Taylor. Taylor also built a dog house.

As the older sister, this is her second year out of Cloverbuds and she raised a feeder calf for the livestock competition.

It was a lot of work, she said, and she’s hoping it will result in a ribbon when the animals are judged today (Wednesday).

 

 

Static competition is offered for 4-H members in needlework, sewing, baked goods, canned goods, crafts, woodworking, photography, antiques, seed and corn, vegetables, floriculture and horticulture. Several categories are offered within each class.

 

Open class competition features several new classes this year also offered for static projects in plastic models; mixed media, mosaic and three-dimensional fine arts; 21 new antiques categories; artistic floral arrangement using purchased flowers; handspun needlework; nine new photography classes; new culinary arts classes for pickles, dough art  and candy display; and lost arts demonstrations.

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