The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
  • Front.homecoming Court
  • Cheer
  • Front.park.lights
  • Front.pull
  • Front.ropes
  • Front.sculpt
  • Front.tar.wide
  • Front.toss
  • Front.walk Across

Quigley's Log Home Bed and Breakfast

Written by David Green.


Jack and Choyce Quigley have had their share of frustrations on the road to becoming proprietors of a bed and breakfast.

Standing in their living room below the high cathedral ceiling, Jack recalls the days when the wind was too strong to climb scaffolding for roof work. They never brought in a crane to assemble the high timbers. It was all done by hand.

He remembers when the three-story “cultured stone” fireplace was about two-thirds built and the mason had to stop for shoulder surgery. For seven weeks, the Quigleys stared at an empty set of scaffolding in their living

A mistake in the blueprints resulted in the dismantling of a garage wall. It took a day to put it up, Jack said. It took three days to take apart. With interlocking logs, it wasn’t just a simple matter of taking down a single wall.

And right from the start, the delivery of the logs…now that was one of the biggest challenges of all. The yellow pine logs headed north out of Tennessee in four semi-trailers. The trucks made it to the intersection of US-127 and Packard Road one day after the frost law signs were posted, forbidding heavy truck travel on the dirt road.

“The drivers saw that sign at Packard and they froze right there,” Jack said. “I called the weigh master and he said to go ahead and do it.”

They still wouldn’t budge.

“The weigh master told the drivers personally.”

Still no go.

The logs were finally dumped at the Hudson Brick Yard. With a forklift there and another at the building site, the logs were slowly transported on a low boy, one small load at a time.

“And it was raining,” says Choyce. A cold, rainy day in March.

That’s all behind them now. They love their home and they love their guests. It’s been an excellent adventure.

Just a Suggestion

The Quigleys lived in Adrian for more than a quarter century. Jack was with the police department there and Choyce still works with the Hickman Cancer Center in Adrian.

Long before they made the move to Acker Highway, Jack knew that was the home site he wanted to develop. It was the 90 acre Strayer farm that Choyce’s grandparents established in 1872, but she was hesitant to move for several years.

Choyce was finally persuaded to leave the city and the couple decided on a log home. A friend at church asked if they had ever considered opening a bed and breakfast.

“It started out as a two-bedroom, two-bath retirement home,” says Jack. “It ended up as a six-bedroom, five-bath bed and breakfast.”

They drew up the plans themselves before Jack headed to a log-building class in Tennessee. He soon realized he couldn’t erect the shell by himself, so he became a member of a construction company work crew to get the job done. After that, the Quigleys managed to handle the bulk of the interior work on their own.

The project started in March 1997 and the Quigleys moved inside in July. The bed and breakfast opened the next year.


Two guest rooms are located upstairs, each with its own bath. The rooms appear simple but amply decorated, and very inviting. Late-risers might choose the room with the window facing south. Choyce insisted the home be built up close to a mature tree that blocks sunlight.

The room facing north is flooded with light, offering a view of farmland and distant woodlots.

Two other rooms were built with families in mind. They’re located in the basement level which, in the back of the house, opens to the back yard and

The lower level includes a family room with toys, a television and tables. That area also functions as a meeting room for school districts, businesses and others seeking an off-site discussion space for groups as large as 16. An area group of scrapbook consultants occasionally buys an overnight package and the evening turns into an adult slumber party.

The Guests

“Aren’t you afraid of strangers coming into your home?”

Choyce has heard that question before, but she dismisses it. She loves people coming into her home.

“Bed and breakfast guests are like family,” she says. “They’re looking for a place that’s like coming home.”

B and B customers are an entirely different clientele, says Jack. They generally aren’t the same people who are just looking for a nice hotel.

For many people, a stay at the Quigleys is their first exposure to rural life.

“It’s fun to introduce people to the country,” Choyce says, and it’s equally gratifying to be part of the family reunions, anniversaries, honeymoons, birthdays, etc. “It’s just so much fun to be part of it.”

With each new guest, the Quigley “family” grows.

“They come as guests and they leave as our friends,” Choyce said.

“That’s our motto,” adds Jack. “About 99 percent of the time that’s what happens.” 

    - July 18, 2001 

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2015