Chat with author Kristin Hannah planned 2012.02.29

Written by David Green.


Sandy Emmons figured it was just a mistake when two boxes of books arrived at her house recently. She serves as treasurer of Morenci’s Stair Public Library board of trustees, so it seemed possible that her address got mixed up with the library’s.

When she opened the boxes and discovered 18 hardcover copies of Kristin Hannah’s “Night Road,” she realized it was no mistake. Sandy is also co-founder of Sandy and Jane’s Book Club, the book discussion group that meets monthly at the library.

The reason for the boxes was now clear to Sandy: The books were for a chat with one of America’s most popular authors.

“This is huge,” Sandy said. “For Morenci, this is a pretty big coup. She’s very well known. Even many people who don’t read a lot do read her.”

The thrill of the books’ arrival was enough on its own, but a coincidence arose that made it even better.

Sandy owns a copy of “Night Road” but she had lent it to someone without yet reading it herself. For some reason she had the urge to read it so after work she went to the library and checked out a copy.

The two boxes were waiting for her when she got home. Now she had 19 copies.

Sandy frequently sends out e-mails and Facebook requests for author chats. She sent a message to Hannah asking about a chat and was told to submit her request at the author’s website. She had done that in the past and never heard back, but she gave it another try.

“This time I said Kristin said to come to the website and to ask her if she would talk to us,” Sandy recalls.

Her persistence paid off.

She knows a chat is in the works, but she’s hoping for something even better than a telephone talk. She prefers a Skype chat where everyone interacts via the internet for a video discussion.

Morenci’s library has done it before with another author, but Hannah only recently completed her first Skype visit. Sandy doesn’t know how it went, but she hopes it was a success so Morenci will get the same. There are still a few weeks until the talk—7 p.m. March 19—so Sandy awaits word from the author’s publicist.

“Night Road” isn’t Kristin Hannah’s most recent book, but it’s one that the book club hasn’t yet discussed.

“She’s one of our book discussion group’s favorite authors,” Sandy said. “We usually read one of her books every year.”

Fayette’s [email protected] book club just discussed a Hannah book in January, but they’re going to put “Night Road” next on their list and join Morenci’s group next month for the chat.

Sandy hopes to see other new faces at the event, too.

“It’s a good time for someone to come to a book discussion who has never come before,” she said.

In this case the author will do a lot of the talking, but even for the regular discussions, talking certainly isn’t required.

“Some people think that if they come to a book discussion they have to say their feelings about the book, but we have some members who...we’ve been doing this 15 years...have never talked.”

Sandy intends to read “Night Road” about a week before the author chat so it’s still fresh in her mind. She says it’s not all that unusual for her to own a book that she hasn’t yet read.

“If you knew how many books I have...” she said. “Some women buy shoes and purses. I buy books.”

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016