Lowell Beaverson sells insurance agency 2012.01.18

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

lowell beaversonLowell Beaverson has been a Main Street fixture in downtown Fayette for more than 20 years, but his insurance career actually started long before that.

He began selling insurance nearly 48 years ago, in 1964, and although he isn’t ready to end his long career yet, he’s going to be spending less time in the office.

Lowell recently sold his business to the Walters and Peck Agency in Bryan and now, in addition to Lowell, customers will also see Carrie Dunson who brings more than 12 years of experience to the insurance field.

Lowell believes he’s leaving his business in good hands. The Walters and Peck Agency has served northwest Ohio for more than 78 years and is now one of the region’s old independent agencies.

The company was established in 1933 and is licensed in Ohio, Michigan and Indiana, representing several property, casualty, bond and life insurance companies.

“Walters and Peck is proud to be part of the Fayette community and looks forward to serving Fayette and the surrounding communities for many years to come,” said Dean Day, president of the agency.

Lowell left Fayette for 13 years after high school. He served in the Air Force, went to college on the G.I. Bill, and started selling farm chemicals out of Pawpaw, Mich. When he returned to Fayette, he was selling agricultural lime for Martin Marietta.

After Lowell obtained his insurance license in 1964, he bought Pearl Weller’s agency in Fayette. Pearl was 85 years old and had been in the business for a quarter century.

Lowell was still working in sales at the time, but Pearl told him he could handle the insurance business on weekends and in the evenings.

That’s what Lowell did for a time, until the lime sales slowed and he was laid off. That’s when he decided to expand the insurance business and picked up several customers when Walter Givin’s agency closed.

An Archbold agency had purchased the Givin business, but the Fayette office was closed after a couple of years.

Lowell moved to a downtown office around 1980 and that’s where he’s remained ever since.

“There have been lots of changes in the insurance industry,” Lowell said, and he feels rather old-fashioned.

For example, he prefers a paper ledger to a computerized accounting system.

It’s been an enjoyable career, but he’s looking forward to being able to get out of the office more often.

“It’s nice to get the responsibility off my shoulders,” he said.

Lowell expects to do more traveling in his new-found spare time.

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