The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Fried bologna: it's the specialty at the Buckboard Bar & Grill

Written by David Green.

By JEFF PICKELL

Few may have known that last Tuesday was National Bologna Day, but for Fayette residents Debbie and Gary Ragsdale, every day is bologna day.

The owners of the Buckboard Bar and Grill in downtown Fayette, their Red Burger—or fried bologna sandwich—is a hit. People have come from Toledo to sample the restaurant’s signature item, which includes a nearly half-inch thick quarter-pound slice of bologna topped with cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, onions and mayonnaise.fried.bologna

The Red Burger—named after Red Keller, the bar’s fried bologna-loving former owner—sells just as well as the hamburger, said Gary.

“Most fried bologna sandwiches contain stacks of individual slices. We give you the one thick patty,” said Debbie.

Not a burger or bologna fan? There’s a sandwich on the list for almost everyone—the rueben with homemade sauerkraut, the steak sandwich, the breaded pork sandwich.

Gary, who considers himself a sandwich artist, often receives comments about how his sandwiches look like they come right out of a TV commercial.

“I put plenty of tender love and care into making them,” he said.

The Buckboard has been open for lunch for nearly a year now, and the sandwiches are a takeout favorite for workers downtown. Still, many local residents aren’t aware of its menu. Fayette resident Mike Figgins, who hadn’t been to the restaurant, was surprised to see Gary making sandwiches when he stopped in last week.

Now, with a newly installed fryer, the Buckboard’s menu has grown even more comprehensive, featuring appetizers and other fare.

That’s not all that’s new at the Buckboard, which takes its name from a wagon used during the 19th and early 20th century.

When the Ragsdales bought the bar —formerly called Harry’s—from Red and Artie Keller two years ago, their goal from the outset was to transform it from a generic establishment to an authentic “country and western” bar and grill.

Both Gary and Debbie spent years in the country music industry. A guitar player and singer, Gary has played in a number of bands, including one headed by Merle Haggard’s son, Marty. He was once so involved that he played five to six shows a week in addition to working a day job.

Things have slowed down since the move to Fayette, but the Ragsdales still host jam sessions at the Buckboard beginning at 2 p.m. Sundays.

Anyone who can play an instrument is welcome to attend, said Gary, but it helps to have a taste for country music or southern rock and roll.

The Buckboard Bar and Grill opens at 11 a.m. Tuesday through Sunday.

    - Nov. 15, 2006 

It's actually Italian sausage 

What exactly is bologna, anyway? A common joke is that it’s a combination of whatever a butcher sweeps off the floor after carving the choice cuts. In reality, bologna is just as noble a sausage as any other variety.

Technically, bologna is a version of mortadella, an Italian sausage comprised of finely hashed pork sausage combined with lard pieces, typically from the pig’s neck. However, in addition to pork, bologna can be made from chicken, turkey, beef and soybeans.

The sausage takes its name from the Italian city in which it was popularized, but no one knows when people first started making it. Some food experts claim bologna was around as early as A.D. 500, while others think it didn’t appear until after the renaissance.

Traditionally, bologna consists of cured beef, cured pork or a mixture of the two that is seasoned with salt, pepper and sugar. Various regional recipes also add seasonings such as cayenne pepper, coriander seed and garlic, but, as with many foods, there’s no one way to make bologna. Bologna recipes exist that make use of venison and moose.

While mass producers of bologna puree the meat so that machines can pour it into synthetic collagen sleeves, the experts say a good gourmet sausage is best served chopped fine and stuffed in sleeves made from the gastro-intestinal tracts of cattle, sheep or hogs.

If you’re particularly bonkers for bologna, you might want to plan a trip to Newfoundland, where the inhabitants are known to serve up a tasty cut of barbecued bologna, referred to as a Newfie steak.

Finally, don’t be fooled. Spelling bologna “baloney” is a bunch of baloney. Coined by the French, “baloney” refers to the incomprehensible legalese for which graduates of the University of Bologna law school are known.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016