Officer Chad Double earns another honor 2011.07.13

Written by David Green.

chad_doubleBy DAVID GREEN

1994 Morenci graduate Chad Double wasn’t sure what he wanted to study when he first went to college, but police work was one of the possibilities in the back of his head.

By the second year of school at Eastern Michigan University, his mind was made up. He went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and psychology.

Double’s police work led to a recent award from the Farmington Hills Optimist Club as the Police Officer of the Year.

After his graduation from college, Double was hired by the University of Michigan as a public safety officer, but soon joined the Farmington Hills Police Department as a cadet. He was sent to the Oakland County Police Academy and promoted to a police officer in 2003, joining the department’s road patrol.

In 2008 he was assigned to the investigative division and his work there led to the recent award. Double was involved in the investigation of a child abuse report that resulted in the arrest of the responsible person who ultimately confessed. That accomplishment led to a Unit Citation from his department.

He also received a Merit Citation for his involvement in a multi-agency investigation that was initiated by a threat complaint and culminated with the identification, charging and conviction of a subject for the death of his girlfriend.

Awards are nothing new to Double. During the presentation at the Optimist Club meeting, Farmington Hills Chief of Police Chuck Nebus mentioned that Double has been honored 12 times since joining the Department in 2001. He was awarded two merit citations, one professional service award, two citations, four unit citations, two commendations and numerous letters of appreciation from citizens. In 2009 he was named Police Officer of the Year by the local American Legion post.

“We’re very proud of Officer Double,” Chief Nebus said. “He continues to be a tremendous asset to the department. His dedication and initiative have brought a number of significant investigations to successful conclusions.”

At his high school graduation, Double received the “Against all Odds” award due to the challenges he faced. His mother, Beverly, died when he was 12 years old and his father, Paul, died when Double was 16. During the remainder of his time at home, he was raised by his grandmother, Evelyn Shadbolt.

He now lives in Westland, Mich., with his wife, daughter and step-son.

Giving assistance to others in need is what Double appreciates about his career.

“Helping people is my favorite part of this job,” he said. “It is such a great feeling knowing you have the opportunity to help when someone is depending on you.”

His promotion to the investigative unit added a new, satisfying dimension to a job he already loved.

“I enjoy being a detective and taking a case from the beginning and building it and trying to figure out what happened.”

Double said the change from small-town life in Morenci to the much larger Farmington Hills is significant.

“So many people are moving in and out of the city. It is very different than in a small town community where everybody knows everybody and they come together in times of need.”

He enjoys where he’s living and working, but he also looks back with fondness on his past.

 “I am very proud to have grown up in such a fine community as Morenci and I truly miss it,” he said.

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