The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

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    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
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    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Jean (Sutton) Everline: The Dome Home

Written by David Green.


In addition to the comfortable living conditions, low heating and cooling costs, and a roof that never needs to be re-shingled, the five years Sam and Jean Everline devoted to their “dome home” is paying off in the form of a self-proclaimed five minutes of fame.

domehome Look for Jean, whom some might know as former Morenci resident Jean Sutton, and Sam on an episode of Home and Garden Television’s “Offbeat America,” airing Sunday at 6 p.m.
The video crew arrived to shoot the segment in November. Jean said they weren’t the first to receive a guided walkthrough of the Quincy, Mich. residence.

“We give nickel tours constantly,” she said, and not only to friends and family. Curious strangers have stopped in off the street with questions for the Everlines. One of these strangers must have been a representative from the Quincy Chamber of Commerce, because when HGTV called her looking for unusual homes, the Everlines came to mind.

It’s not hard to see why. Their house is one of southeastern Michigan’s only homes completely submerged in turf. Of these rare earth-sheltered homes,  as they are termed, it’s the only one Sam knows of that’s also dome-shaped. Most are shaped like boxes.

“They cost an arm and a leg and require a lot of support beams,” said Sam of the box-shaped designs.
Domed houses, on the other hand, support themselves.

“It’s egg shaped,” said Jean. “You know how an egg is. You can’t crush it.”

Jean said their house didn’t cost any more to build than a regular middle-income home. It did, however, take a little longer. That’s because Sam and Jean preferred to do the vast majority of the work themselves. Construction began in 1999. They moved in in 2004.

Sam works the second shift at Metaldyne in Litchfield. Every morning before work, he logged time at the house. He also devoted most of his weekends to it. 

“I hired some help for the heavy steel and cement, but I never hired a general contractor,” said Sam.

Throughout the entire project, the Everlines stayed cost conscious. Sam used styrofoam to help form the dome, then reused it as insulation. The dome shape also allowed for the use of much less concrete than a box would have, said Sam.

Now that the home is completed, the Everlines are saving money in heating and cooling costs. It’s hard for heat to penetrate, or escape from, their natural soil  insulator, said Jean. 

In the winter, a 60,000 BTU boiler keeps the 2,300 square foot structure warm. Compare this with the 150,000 to 175,000 BTU furnaces that heat most houses of similar size, Sam said.

In the summer months, the temperature in the house rarely gets above 77 degrees, said Jean. The Everlines rely only on ceiling fans to keep cool.

But wouldn’t it get dark in an underground house?

Sam engineered the house so the 21 windows on its front receive the maximum amount of sunlight in the cold months leading up to the winter solstice. They receive less direct sunlight as it heats up and gets closer to the summer solstice. The home gets more than enough sunlight to support the various houseplants the Everlines grow, said Sam.

Jean says that, in their entire residence, which consists of a sun room, living room, dining room, bedroom, bathroom and loft, the only room that doesn’t get direct sunlight is the bathroom.
And since the house is constructed almost exclusively of brick and concrete, outdoor maintenance is minimal.

In the warm months, Sam waters and trims the roof, but that’s about all the work the structure requires.

This is fortunate, because in the weeks leading up to the arrival of the camera crew, the home’s interior required a lot of finishing touches. Thankfully, they had Morenci residents Jeff and Cathy Sallows, Dave and Connie Ford, and Keith and Yvonne Smith to lend a helping hand. They assisted the Everlines in various staining, cleaning and trim projects.

“We wouldn’t look half as good on TV without these folks,” said Jean.

    - March 22, 2006

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