The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Fayette, one year younger than listed 2011.04.20

Written by David Green.

Fay.1919_photo_of_South_sideBy DAVID GREEN

It’s not that Fayette is a “young” community.

There’s a record of the first log cabin constructed in 1845. A saw mill was erected in 1850, followed a few years later by a grist mill.

A village of about 40 people existed in 1859 and the first union school opened in 1862.

But it wasn’t until 10 years later that the settlement was officially incorporated as the Village of Fayette.

Or was it 11 years later?

Kathleen Fix will tell you it’s 11 years and she has the documentation to back up that claim.

For years Fayette’s incorporation was known to be 1872 and the centennial was celebrated a hundred years later in 1972.

That was one year early, Kathy says.

Fay.saw_millShe will attend the village council meeting Monday to present her findings in hopes of shifting Fayette’s official start to 1873.

Kathy’s mother, Vivien Ford, who was long known as Fayette’s historian, learned about the 1873 date in 1972. Village solicitor Cloyce Storrs showed her the pertinent pages from the Fulton County Deeds book that clearly listed 1873 as the founding date.

Vivien talked with Fayette mayor Charlotte Simpson about the situation and the two decided that since centennial plans were well underway, it was too late to worry about a change at that time.

Vivien became busy and never did return to the matter before her death, but her daughter was reminded last year from a source other than the Deed book.

Dale Pfund, owner of Fayette’s D&R Hardware, showed Kathy the historical records of the hardware store. There was a surprise among his documents: a record of Fayette’s incorporation—in 1873.

Kathy and her son, William, drove to the  Fulton County Records Office in Wauseon, turned to page 500 of the Deeds book and transcribed the data.

On June 4, 1873, county commissioners acknowledged a petition signed by 44 people asking for incorporation. The signers represented a population estimated at 300 and a territory described “in length north and south one mile – east and west one half mile.”

Corporation called for the general purposes of:

• improvements of streets and drainage, sidewalks and grating;

• an “ease of property on the streets” to prevent running at large cattle, hogs and other stock to the damage of citizens and visitors;

• to regulate auctioneers, merchants and hoaxers who operate against the interests of the permanent business of the village;

• and to regulate the other matters generally controlled by incorporated villages.

That last point mentioned the growing population of the community which included transients arriving by railroad.

The residents passing through “cannot be properly managed and governed without the restraint of Municipal Law, and as the welfare and interests of this community so imperatively demand it, we most earnestly pray that this, our petition, may be granted.”

D. D. Nichols, Arthur Allen and W. F. Gamber were chosen as the three representatives of the village in negotiations with the county.

On Aug. 7, 1873, county commissioners Herman Canfield, Joseph Shadle and A. B. Thompson reviewed the petition and found everything in order.

“The Board therefore deems it right that such petition be granted, And do cause this their order to be entered upon their Journal that the Corporation as named (Fayette) and asked for in said petition be organized.

– Fulton County, Ohio, Aug. 7th, A. D. 1873”

Forty-four village residents signed the petition for incorporation: Lewis Benner; H. Booth; C. L. Allen; S. Wynn; J. S. Moffitt; B. Colby; L. B. Shipman; John Eddy; W. H. Griffin; L. E. Coleman; H. Collins; E. Punches; E. W. Lewis; D. T. Acker; A. Bryan; G. W. Parker; John Fuller; J. Woolace; D. D. Nichols; E. Rogers; R. J. Paul; R. Spencer; William Trowbridge; B. Purcell; John Gamber; J. Tuesly; Chas. Johnson; B. F. Wise; H. Alford; William Willson; D. Garlic; Frank Vernier; W. Goodole; Alex Wright; W. Reynolds; George Ferriss; A. B. Ely; W. F. Gamber; S. W. Maucker; C. A. Snow; G. W. Heckman; W. A. Barayer; E. Rorick; and G. Ferrold.

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