The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
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Happy Campers at the Fulton County Fair 2010.08.18

Written by David Green.

(Story from Fulton County Fair)

Although America's real estate market has cooled considerably in the past few years, there's land in this neck of the woods that couldn't be hotter right now: the 600 camping spaces at the Fulton County Fair.

According to Dave Murry, the Fair Board director in charge of camping, spaces are so treasured that only five to 10 campers from each previous year fail to reserve “their” space inside the Fairgrounds’ fence by sending in their camping fees on time.

“Half of them are devastated that they forgot to send their money in by the June 1 deadline,” explains Dave, who is superintendant of the City of Wauseon's Public Works Department. “They may post-date a check June 1 and mail it, but then we get it with the postmaster's mark of June 4 or 5. To be fair, I have no choice but to go by the June 1 postmark, even if they're my best friend–but I hate it.”

Forfeited spots go to people who, beginning April 1, call to have their name placed on a waiting list. Each year, the list is started new on April 1. In contrast to the 600 lots inside the Fairgrounds’ fence, primitive campsites, which are by the woods at the southwest corner of the Fairgrounds’ parking lot, are plentiful and lots are still available come Fair Week. Primitive campsites have no electricity, although generators can be used as long as the noise doesn't bother other campers.

Lots and lots of lots

The first reference to camping at the Fair didn’t appear in Fair Board minutes until 1964, although up till then it wasn't unusual for exhibitors to stay overnight with their animals. By 1974, the Board had established 58 camping lots, and discussion was underway about adding two more. Today, Dave says electrical lots inside the fence number “600—easy.” And all are worth their weight in gold to the people who return to them year after year.

“This land is ‘sacred’ to people who camp at the Fair every year,” he explains. “The Fair Board once received a letter from an attorney saying that so-and-so got the former couple's camping space in a divorce settlement. People are in tears if they miss the June 1 deadline. Some people save all year long to camp here. Most of them have been camping here 15 to 20 years.”

A family tradition

Joan and Boomer Rice and Nedra and Richard Fredrick, all of whom are from Fayette, have been camping at the Fair even longer. “Boomer and I started in 1978,” states Joan, “and Nedra and Richard started a year later.”

Back then, the couples, who lived just a half-mile apart when their kids were growing up, decided to camp together – and have been doing so ever since. Today, residents of the Rice-Fredrick six-camper “compound” at the Fair also include the Rice's grandchildren and assorted members of the Fredrick clan, including Nedra and Richard's two adult children, their spouses, and children.

“It takes us about four trips to get everything out here,” Joan laughs. “We have to pack the campers, the picnic tables, the firewood, and the grill. We do as much of the food as we can before we come. Then when we're here we throw stuff on the grill, have potato salad, macaroni salad, brownies. And we always have chili the first night, because the guys are coming and going, watching the tractor pulls.”

“At first, we had all our meals back here,” Nedra said, “but then the kids said, 'This isn't right. We've come to the Fair and we want some of that food.' So they'd eat breakfast here and knew we'd have a meal back here at 5 or 6, but if they wanted to spend their money on Fair food, they could.”

“At night, all the kids would be at Fredrick-Rice campfire till 2 or 3 o'clock in the morning,” reminisces Joan. “Sometimes even later,” Nedra adds, smiling at the memory.

Like the vast majority of Fair campers, the Fredrick and Rice families prefer the creature comforts of campers over tents. “Some people even bring refrigerators and set up cook stoves like they're cooking for an army,” Dave Murry chuckles. “Tents are minimal; maybe just 10 to 15 a year.”

Stakes, well-done

On a Sunday two weeks before each Fair, Dave and a crew of volunteers stake out camping lots, meticulously measuring and labeling each one. It takes five men working from 7 am to late afternoon to get the job done. And this year, they had to do a lot more work before they could even get started.

“We renumbered spaces this year by gate, so we had to repaint all the stakes. I had a whole snowmobile trailer full of them.

“When it gets into about Tuesday before the Fair, Jamie Buehrer, Paul Schultz, and I are there full-time, trying to make sure that we check paperwork before somebody unhooks their camper and drops it in the wrong spot. It takes all three of us to handle it.”

Dave and friend Jamie Buehrer have been staking lots since they were kids. Jamie's father, Carl, has been on the Fair Board since 1972. Dave's late mother, Marilyn, became a Fair Board member in 1984 and was the director in charge of camping. When she passed away in 1998, Dave's dad, Chuck, took her place. When Chuck left the board a few years ago and Dave was elected to it, he picked up his father's mantle.

Long-time love A-Fair

”The Fair gets in your blood, just crawls right in there,” Dave says, explaining why he devotes so much time, including vacations, to the Fair. “There are 15 of us on the Fair Board, and we all have that love for the Fair.” And Dave believes that the love of the Fulton County community for its Fair accounts for the popularity of camping there.

“You can quote my wife Gwen on this,” he states. “She says that if you don't grow up with the Fulton County Fair as a little kid, it's not a big deal to you. But if you grew up with the Fair, there's just a love for it that no one can understand.”

Clearly, that love is alive and well in the Rice and Fredrick clans.

“We've never thought of not camping at the Fair,” Nedra states with conviction. “The Fair is 'reunion' time to see relatives, and friends, and neighbors. We would not give up camping here.”

Joan is more direct: “We'll stop camping at the Fair when we die.”

• To check the availability of primitive camping spaces at the 2010 Fulton County Fair, call 419/335-6006. This year's Fair runs from Sept. 3 through Sept. 9



Long-time Fair campers—Richard and Nedra Fredrick and Joan and Boomer Rice have camped at the Fulton County Fair since the late 1970s. Today, residents of the Rice-Fredrick “camper compound” at the Fair also include the Rice's grandchildren and assorted members of the Fredrick clan, including their two adult children and grandchildren. Richard, Nedra and Joan are in the front. Behind the Fredricks is daughter Kristi and her husband, Kip Humbert, with two of their five children, Rayce (left) and Braelyn.

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