Virginia Vernier: Going home from school after 41 years

Written by David Green.


People are talking about Ginny Vernier’s 38 years of service to the Morenci school district, but that’s not the whole story. Her teaching career actually spanned 41 years when you add in the three at Sand Creek.

In fact, she was ready for another year with the neighboring district to the northeast back in 1965.

ginny “I had already signed a contract with Sand Creek in the spring,” she said. “I got a call from Mr. Geisler [Morenci’s superintendent at the time] and I broke my contract.”

That was frowned on more 40 years ago than it is today, Ginny said, but she grew up in the Morenci district, she still lived in Morenci, and she jumped at the chance to teach here.

Rex Riley was the first of many principals who she outlasted, and she still has much admiration for the man. He wasn’t one to tell a teacher how to do something, but he made his opinion clear.

“Well, do you think that’s a good idea?” Ginny says, imitating the Riley voice.

Ginny wasn’t the sort of teacher who knew as a kid that she belonged in the classroom.

“I really didn’t know what I wanted to do,” she said. “I floundered. My mom made me go to college.”

But she enjoyed helping others, and after she took some education classes, student teaching went really well. It all just blended together, she said.

“Teaching is a very good career for a mother,” Ginny said. “Eventually your hours turn out to be you children’s hours.”

All but five of Ginny’s 41 years have been spent in a kindergarten room. The majority of that time with the traditional half-day every-day format. About 10 years ago the change to the alternate-day program began, and for her last year on the job, the best of all arrived.

This was Morenci’s first year with a full-day every-day program, and she’s completely sold on the concept. Looking through the achievements of this year’s students, she sees accomplishments like never before.

“Common sense tells you that it would improve [with additional time in the classroom], but I was just amazed with the progress. It really made a big difference.”

Time to retire

Ginny intended to last a full 40 years with the Morenci district, but there were several factors that led to her decision to step down.

She wanted to be part of the all-day program, but she didn’t expect it to arrive here as fast as it did. The school board offered a new early severance package, and made sense to Ginny in her position.

“With my twin grandchildren, I knew I would be needed there.”

She also wanted a little more time to spend with her own parents.

The was the first year she had a third generation student. It was Julie (Bachman) Bachelder many years ago, then her daughter, Heather (Bachelder) Cook. This year, Heather’s son, Wyatt, was a student in Ginny’s room.

But mostly, she wanted to go out when she was still on top.

“I wanted to retire when I had a good attitude and still wanted to come to work,” she said. “I didn’t want to wait until it was drudgery. It was a hard decision to make. If I’d hated my job, it wouldn’t have been so hard.”

She’s teary-eyed, she says, but she’s not really sad. Then again, it probably won’t really hit until the fall.

If there’s a regret, it’s probably related to the renovation work underway at the school.

“I do wish I’d have stuck it out for another year to enjoy the new air conditioning.”


    - June 11, 2003
  • Front.cowboy
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  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
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  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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