The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

Jeff Van Havel tells of Iraq experiences

Written by David Green.

Did you shoot rubber bullets?

By DAVID GREEN

Most of the time when Jeff Van Havel goes to work, he pilots a 727 airliner fitted for cargo delivery for United Parcel Service.

“It’s overnight delivery for UPS,” he told Morenci’s first grade students last Thursday morning. “We fly packages all night long.”

van-havel-visiting But every now and then, he gets a call from the U.S. Air Force and then he’s flying a  totally different aircraft with an entirely new mission.

That’s what happened a few weeks ago when Major Van Havel was called to duty in the Middle East.

“My friends and I were almost on the other side of the world,” he said. “We shot and bombed the Iraqi army most every day for two months.”

“Did you shoot rubber bullets?” asked a first grader.

It was the real thing, he explained. They fired depleted uranium bullets.

“Did they shoot at you?” a student wondered.

“I think I got shot at more than anyone in my squadron,” he answered. “There were four missiles shot at me and hundreds of rounds of bullets.”

However, it was two other members of his group that were shot down. Neither of the pilots was injured.

“Who won?” a student asks.

“Military, we won,” answered the guest. “The hard part is to make peace after the war. Did we win the fight and get what we wanted? It will take years to know.”

“Did you go to bed in Iraq?”

Major Van Havel explained that most of his flights were out of Kuwait, but for 10 days he lived at a captured air base in Iraq.

“It was dry and dirty. There was no running water, no electricity, 100° outside,” he said. “We pretty much lived in tents.”

“Did you have mines?” asked a youngster.

The major explained that as a member of the Air Force, he wasn’t on the ground much, but that wasn’t the case when he fought in Afghanistan. There were still areas not cleared of mines in that country, and some fighting went on quite close to his base.

“How do you take off?” asks a young scientist.

“It’s a matter of physics,” he responded, and attempted to explain the principle of thrust to seven-year-olds.

Someone wanted to know what the world looks like from a jet fighter.

“At night,” he said, “it almost looks like a giant black and white map,” as streets and cities are illuminated.

Special goggles are worn to assist night vision, and pilots often use binoculars to home in on targets. Otherwise, they have to fly low and risk attack from the ground.

van-havel-reading Van Havel said he called home most every day to talk with his wife, Teresa, and his three children—first, by using his cell phone, and later, through the military phone system once it was put back into operation after the early days of the battle.

Major Van Havel was introduced to a first grade student named Justice Richardson, whose father is about to be called to duty.

“I know you’re going to miss him,” Van Havel said, “but you should be really proud of him.”

Van Havel looked at the cards made by students and he said how much cards and letters mean to a soldier stationed away from home.

He wrapped up his visit by telling the students what he expected from them in the future.

“We live in a rich, free country where we can speak our minds,” he said, “but it doesn’t mean it will always stay that way. Some day it will be your responsibility. When I’m an old man, I want you guys to protect me.”


- May 28, 2003

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