The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Logan Coy: Mending a Broken Heart 2010.03.24

Written by David Green.


Heart surgery at three days old. Celebrated his first birthday Dec. 11 by having his chest closed up following more surgery. Five trips to the operating room in the past few months.

No wonder they call him Super Logan. He just doesn’t give up the fight.logan.coy.jpg

Logan, the son of Matt and Kendra (Hibbard) Coy, was born with several heart defects, including the absence of a pulmonary valve and a hole between the bottom ventricles.

“His heart was twisted around about 180 degrees,” explained his grandfather, Ken Hibbard of Fayette.

Problems were discovered about three hours after he was born and a shunt was placed in his heart on the third day of his life.

That procedure was done to allow him to grow stronger before the next step: surgery to  repair a “broken heart.”

Around the end of November Logan had started to become rather active, Ken said, and then he would turn blue. That’s the sign the doctors were waiting for.

The Coys took their son back to C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor for surgery and he remains there today.

Kendra, a Fayette graduate, took on the duty of chief reporter for Logan’s CarePages website provided by the University of Michigan Health System. Throughout the region, dozens of friends and relatives are following Logan’s travails through Kendra’s  and Matt’s updates.

Occasionally she would take a weekend at home to spend time with the Coys’ two-year-old son, Landon. In late February, she and Matt decided that one them had to go back to work, and Kendra was the one to go. She now sees Logan on weekends and sporadically during the week.

Tracking Logan’s up and down progress through the CarePages is a heart-wrenching experience.

• Dec. 1: Surgery lasted nine hours and was one of the most difficult the surgeon has ever taken on.

• Dec. 3: A bridge inserted to hold his sternum apart to keep pressure off the heart. The chest remains open due to concerns about blood pressure.

• Dec. 7: Bridge removed but chest remains open.

• Dec. 10: Additional surgery might be needed to replace a baffle. “That was like getting punched in the stomach,” Kendra wrote.

• Dec. 11: His first birthday, the day his chest was closed.

• Dec. 12: Problems with infections; concern about seizures.

• Dec. 13: Told his heart is failing. Chest reopened.

And so it goes, with steps forward and slides backward. Logan’s heart is now quite well known among the cardiologists at UM.

For Kendra and Matt, the current hospitalization has been a difficult four-month ordeal—four months and counting.

Kendra has been forced to act as a mother from a distance, sharing her son with the medical staff.

“I showed the nurse how to rub the inside of the ear,” she wrote in December. “That’s one of his favorite things that helps put him to sleep.”

“They’re gonna let me help give Logan a bath and then hold him,” she wrote a month later. “I’m so excited.”

Two days later: “It was a huge orchestrated event with the respiration therapist and three nurses but I did it! I held him for two hours straight. Both of my legs ‘fell asleep’ and were completely numb, but I did not care one bit.”

New challenges have arisen as efforts continue to wean Logan off his many medications and to try out new ones.

The last update filed Saturday announced that Logan was moved to the moderate care ward, a step down from pediatric ICU. That’s a positive sign, although it led to an entirely new crew of physicians and nurses.

“I think mom and dad are having more trouble than he is,” Kendra wrote.

A new heart rate medication seems to be working, but pacemaker wires still protrude from Logan’s chest in case the equipment is needed again.

There’s no way of knowing what lies ahead, but Kendra and Matt see their son as slowly heading in the right direction.

Benefit event

Two of Kendra’s best childhood friends, Kelly Wallace and Missy Kope, came up with the idea of organizing a fund-raiser to help the Coys with financial challenges. They’re both Toledo residents and are seeking donations in that area.

Kendra’s mother, Pam Hibbard, and Kendra’s sister, Kandi Lemley, are organizing an evening of food and fun to serve as a benefit in Fayette.

On April 24, the public is invited to Fayette High School for food, a 50/50 drawing, a silent auction, karaoke, a corn hole tournament and more.

Donations of food or items for the silent auction are welcomed. For more information, call Pam at 419/237-2622 or Kandi at 419/237-3269.

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