The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

From fossils to geodes, students rock out 2010.02.24

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Steve Tchozeski picked up a large object from a table and held it up for Morenci second grade students to see. It didn’t take students long to figure out they were looking at an enormous tooth.front.fossils.jpg

“This came from an animal that walked through your playground about 10,000 years ago,” said Mr. Tchozeski, from Great Lakes GeoScience.

It came from a mastodon skeleton that was found not too far from Morenci, he said, and he noted that mastodons covered quite a wide range in their search for food.

It just might have plodded through Morenci at one time.

Next Mr. Tchozeski showed students some common fossils found in Michigan such as coral—a marine organism that lives in clear, shallow, tropical oceans.

What does this tell you about Michigan’s past?

“This tells me that at one time Michigan was covered with a warm, tropical ocean,” Mr. Tchozeski said.

The coral had been imbedded in limestone collected from a quarry near Charlevoix, Mich. It was about 350 million years old.

Mr. Tchozeski told the young science students they would soon be given a small sack of Charlevoix limestone and a special scientific instrument to assist their collection of fossils—a toothbrush.

Anything they found—coral, brachiopods, sponges—they could keep to take home.

Mr. Tchozeski explained that scientists must use their knowledge of plants and animals to work as detectives to learn about the past.steve.tchozeski.jpg

He picked up an enormous footprint embedded in rock—the print of a three-toed dinosaur. A friend of his found a path of the footprints that extended nearly a mile. The raptors walked through mud which, over millions of years, became shale rock.

By comparing the prints to today’s lizards, his friend concluded the animals were walking. A running or jumping dinosaur would have left a much different footprint behind. Small prints were found in the center of the trail, with larger prints on the outside.

“The babies were in the middle and the older dinosaurs were on the outside,” Mr. Tchozeski said. “They were good parents.”

He wrapped up his examples of how scientists read fossils, then gave students their turn to become paleontologists for the day.

• Great Lakes Geoscience offers a variety of geological experiences for school students. In addition to the fossil program for the second grade, fourth grade students were given a quartz crystal dig; kindergarten students looked at geodes; first grade students studied minerals; and third graders learned about volcanoes.

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