The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Class learns to make sushi 2009.01.07

Written by David Green.

Rice, vegetables, fish...but hold the seaweed, please.sushi.plate.jpg

Dried seaweed was probably the least popular item on the serving table last month when Nina Howard taught a class in Morenci on sushi making.

Howard, who coordinates the Japanese exchange program for the Lenawee Intermediate School District mentioned at a meeting of school art teachers that she’s taught LISD staff members how to make sushi.

When she offered her services to the teachers, Morenci Area High School instructor Kym Ries jumped at the opportunity. Her Art Club members were involved in a series of programs called “Food as Art” and she knew that sushi would fit right in.

Howard agreed.

“I doubt if any culture in the world is more serious about the food/art connection than the Japanese,” she said.

People hear the word “sushi” and they think  of raw fish, but that’s not accurate. Sashimi (raw fish) is often used in sushi, but sushi doesn’t necessarily include fish.

It doesn’t have to include seaweed, either, although the dried sheets help hold the creation together and when placed inside a layer of rice, the dark seaweed adds the important element of color variation.sushi.makers.jpg

Food as art, Howard says.

Students learned to make an ultra thin omelet that can be cut into strips and used as decoration or stuffed with ingredients and tied to look like a gift package.

They also tried their hand at using a sushi forming box—a good choice for beginners—and at making maki, the traditional rolled sushi.

And if the seaweed is a tough concept to swallow, there’s always the pickled ginger. A bite of that acidic item serves as a palate cleanser to prepare for the next variety of sushi.

“Itada-kimasu!”

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