The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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Morenci now part of Ohio 1987.04.01

Written by David Green.



The survey crews from the Ohio Department of the Interior should have given a clue that something was happening. Something was—and in a big way.

Shocking as it may seem, Morenci now lies within the boundaries of Ohio.

When asked about a possible appeal, city attorney Greg Grover replied, “No, it’s final. The boundary was established by the U.S. Congress.”

“The transfer of land described herein to the State of Ohio becomes effective Wednesday, April First,” said A. Pearl Foolse, a representative of the Michigan Attorney General’s office.

A border dispute between Michigan and Ohio (“The Toledo War”) was settled in 1836, explained Foolse, just prior to Michigan’s statehood, but it wasn’t until February of this year that a surveying error was discovered, invalidating the 150-year-old boundary.

By act of Congress in June 1836, Ohio received a strip of land seven miles wide at the Indiana border and 11 miles wide at the eastern border along Lake Erie, including Toledo. Michigan, in turn, was granted 9,000 square miles of land which now makes up the western portion of the Upper Peninsula.

An erroneous reading by surveyors incorrectly laid out Ohio’s northern border. The new boundary now runs along a line approximately 100 yards north of Mulberry Road.

The letter from the Attorney General’s office reads: “All territory located from 84° 8’ W (Hillsdale County’s western boundary) to Lake Erie, and from the current Michigan/Ohio boundary north to 41° 44’ N is duly transferred to the State of Ohio.”

A sophomore geography student at Ohio State University, Jesse Joe King, was credited with discovering the error in measurement, and the Ohio Department of State wasted little time in correcting the problem.

A letter from Gov. James Blanchard’s office expressed both dismay and sorrow at losing this southern portion of the state, especially during the sesquicentennial year, but remarked, “That’s the way the ball bounces.”

Included in a packet of information from the capitol building in Columbus was a reminder that personal property taxes are due April 30 and that the sales tax in Fulton County is currently six percent.

Preliminary assessments for cleaning of the Tiffin River (Bean Creek) will be mailed later in the month.

Morenci Mayor Ken Walker was one of the first to learn of the change, and the news didn’t sit too well at City Hall.

“As far as I’m concerned, the biggest thing Ohio has going for it is Harrison Lake,” stated Walker.

City attorney Grover expressed some concern about possible legal problems with the change, especially in property ownership.

“There may be some problems with land titles,” he surmised. “The records are all out of state now, I don’t know if they’ll recognize them in Ohio.”

Grover, a resident of Ohio, offered this encouragement to the new Buckeyes: “The roads ought to improve and taxes ought to be lower.”

He’ll speak to city council next week about Morenci joining the attempts to land the Northwest Ohio regional jail. “It’ll mean 160-200 jobs,” stated Grover.

Although no changes will be made in the telephone exchange, Morenci Postmaster Ruth Baird was puzzled over the city’s future zip code assignment.

All the numbers in 435 region are either in use or reserved for businesses, she explained, so it won’t be a simple matter of changing to 43556. She advised residents to continue using the old zip code until she receives notification from Washington.

Like everyone, the news took Superintendent of Schools Neal Singles by surprise.

“I honestly don’t know what to expect,” he said Tuesday afternoon. “I know we’re going to finish out the week—maybe the month—just as we have been.”

“If those in the know had any sense, they’d let us finish the school year as part of Michigan,” he said. “I’ve been calling Lansing all day and haven’t gotten anywhere. I suppose I should try Columbus.”

The prospects of splitting the district between Fayette and Evergreen didn’t appeal to Singles, and he’ll fight hard for keeping the district together as it is presently.

Athletic director Jim Gilmore has already contacted officials from the Northwest Ohio Athletic League (NWOAL) about admission to the conference.

A representative from Ohio Governor Richard Celeste’s Committee on Interstate Cooperation will set up a temporary office in City Hall next week to assist with the change. Counseling for distraught residents will be provided free of charge.

– April 1, 1987

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