The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

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    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
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    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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House tour: Greg and Stephanie Moore 2007.11.14

Written by David Green.


For Greg and Stephanie Moore, it was a case of love at first sight.

Lots of brick, lots of space, lots of possibilities.

“When my husband and I first looked at the house, we fell in love with it,” Stephanie said. “We loved the brick, and it’s all brick—not just a façade. It had lots of potential and lots of room.”

And then the work began, and maybe someday it will end. So it goes for the owners of an older home, but it’s all worth the effort for the Moores.

Changes began right on the front porch which was enclosed when they bought the house.

“That was our first, scary project,” Stephanie

The wood supporting the screens was rotting in places so they decided to tear out rather than repair. They’re content with the open-air porch and intend to leave it that way.

Inside the porch is a foyer with a slate floor—slate that Stephanie believes could be original. A glance into the living room shows there’s plenty of original woodwork.

The living room features a fireplace with a cast iron covering, surrounded by brickwork that continues onto the floor. A built-in bookcase is on the opposite wall, just to the right of a large glass pocket door leading into the dining room.

The house is heated with hot-water baseboard heaters, a feature that Stephanie appreciates. The Moores lived in a house with forced-air heat before and the heating feels a lot more even now, she said. It’s also arranged in three zones and the upstairs, for example, can be turned down during the day.

There’s a reason many of the walls are painted instead of papered. The Moores have counted five or six layers of wallpaper underneath the paint of the 1909 home, and they’ve found that removing those layers sometimes takes the old plaster off, too.

“You can either strip it off and replace with drywall or you can do what others have done—paint over it.”

The dining room has plate rails on the walls and a built-in buffet at one end.

“I think we’ve replaced every light fixture in this house,” Stephanie said glancing up at the chandelier.

They’ve chosen new fixtures that blend in with the old style of the home.

When the Moores bought the home in 2002, the dining room came with beige carpet around the outer border and a multi-colored rectangular inset in the middle under the table.

It disguises spills, Stephanie said. With nine-year-old daughter Courtney and six-year-old son Gregory—plus all of their friends—there are some spills.

Changes in the kitchen were minimal, Stephanie said, with the exception of removing one section of countertop and cabinets for installation of a dishwasher. The cabinets are now on the other side of the room.

There’s also a new sink—the site of the geyser of water that reached the ceiling during the installation process.

“My husband is really very handy,” Stephanie said, “but plumbing is always a challenge.”

At the back of the kitchen is a breakfast nook, an area of the house that once served as the rear entrance. What was at one time the exterior brick of the house makes up one wall of the airy room.

There’s a barn visible out the rear windows, a structure that former owners converted into a one-car space with an adjacent work area.

There’s not a lot of yard, and that took some getting used to.

“The yard was a shock to us coming from the country,” Stephanie said, but they kept in mind that the city has parks for the kids.

When they want to stay closer to home, there’s the club house that Greg built in the back yard, plus a large basement toy room.

“The house is always full of kids,” Stephanie said.

An odd half-size door opens to a small pantry adjacent to the kitchen, and farther down the hallway is a set of built-in drawers.

The former toy room—before the basement was fixed up—is now Stephanie’s office.

Up the stairs is a wide, open hallway leading to three bedrooms with enormous closets. Young Greg’s closet could be shrinking soon since plans call for an expansion of the upstairs bathroom to include a tub.

Courtney has the room that leads to a balcony on the front of the house.

A lot of work has gone into refurbishing the nearly 100-year-old structure and the Moores know there will be lot more to do in the future, but this is the house they fell in love with and all the labor they put into it is well worth the time.


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