The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

Farewell to the Glamourette 08.29.2007

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Iola Borton remembers how it all started. She and Faye Graf each operated beauty salons in Morenci, but they decided to open a shop together in Fayette.

They would split their time between the two communities as they saw to the hair dressing needs of ladies throughout the area.

But what to name the new shop?

As Iola recalls, they had a contest and gave the winner a free perm.

That’s how the Glamourette Beauty Shop began about 45 years ago.

Iola remembers how it started; Karen Lavinder knows how it will end.

The old building on the west edge of Fayette’s business district will soon be torn down to create parking space at the Christian Church.

Karen will close the shop at the end of the week and the Glamourette will be gone.glamourette.interior.jpg

When the shop first opened, it was located on the north side of Fayette’s Main Street, where Lowell Beaverson now operates an insurance agency. Jane Redman of Morenci ran the salon; Iola and Faye spent a couple of days there each week.

Eventually that building became the Silver Hanger clothing store and the Glamourette moved across the street, just west of the village office.

Karen started her hair-cutting career in the original location. Eventually she bought the business from Jane Reppert, by now the owner of the Glamourette. 

More than hair

Most people know the building at 201 W. Main St. only as a hair salon, but there was much more before that, and much of the history is lost.

Wanda Bacon is probably more familiar with its past than anyone since her father, William Hippert, was once the owner.

One photo, presumably from the 1800s, shows the building with a large millinery sign on the front.

After the original Fayette Christian Church burned, Wanda was told that members gathered in the building for services until the new church was completed in 1908.

Wanda’s father opened a gas station in the building—back when there were gas stations on nearly every corner—and  a repair shop operated in the back. There’s still a large overhead door along Cherry Street.glamour.now.jpg

“I remember the garage, but I can’t remember the gas pumps,” Wanda said, thinking back in history.

The curb is still cut out where cars once drove in for gas, her husband John pointed out.

The mechanic from the garage moved to Lyons to open his own repair shop and the Fayette business faltered.

Wanda’s father later created a small bowling alley, with balls that were smaller than regulation, but that didn’t prove to be much of a success.

Upstairs, Edna Smith operated a beauty shop and there was an apartment in the back. Wanda and John Bacon once lived there, entering the apartment via a stairway at the back of the building.

Gene Wilson was the building owner when the Silver Hanger came into being. He remodeled the street front portion for the new home of the Glamourette.

It’s been Karen Lavinder’s home away from home ever since.

End of era

Karen knows the closure of the shop is not good news for her customers.

“I’ve been cutting hair here for 40 years, she said. “There’s not a lot of happy people. People don’t like change.”

When her shop closes, the Razor’s Edge will become the only salon inside the village.

Karen said that about a third of her customers come from out of town. Some of them have moved away. Some still have relatives in Fayette. One customer who now lives in Monroe still makes appointments at the shop.

And the most extreme show of loyalty? When Fayette Tubular Products closed 10 years ago, a few employees transferred to Tennessee. When some of them head north to visit, they stop in at the Glamourette to get their hair done.

Karen knows she’ll miss the relationships she’s developed over the years.

“People think beauty shops are gossipy places, but they’re not really,” she said. “People just talk about their families.”

After following the trials and tribulations, the achievements and marriages through years and years, Karen has come to know many families quite well.

Sometimes she almost feels like a family member, as though she knows so many people that she’s never met. She’s certainly come to know her clients well.

“I’ve met a lot of very, very nice people,” Karen said.

When the Glamourette closes, she won’t be reopening in a new location. She has an interview this week for a part-time job completely unrelated to the beauty salon.

“I’m done with hair,” she said, and Fayette will be done with one of its long-time businesses.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016