Gem Cutters: Gem & Mineral Society show off skills at annual gathering

Written by David Green.

By JEFF PICKELL

Over the robust clangs of metal hitting metal, symphony music echoes through the dim, expansive garages of Eddie Jarzembski’s auto repair shop in rural Fayette. Buckets of stone, slabs of rock and fossilized fauna sit near walls or lean against old equipment.

Crusty and unrefined, the stones seem out of place next to the streamlined classic cars lined up for service.feature.rockman

However, the dazzling aquamarine mineral affixed to Eddie’s belt buckle indicates a promise that one day these unmodified slabs will be just as beautiful as their automotive roommates are.

Eddie is an amateur lapidary—an artisan who cuts, polishes and engraves precious stones and minerals, often for use in jewelry, as beads or for decoration. The craft  fascinated Eddie his entire life, but he didn’t take a turn at the trade until five or six years ago.

That’s when he joined the State Line Gem and Mineral Society, a non-profit organization that recently purchased the old depot in downtown Morenci to use as a workshop, teaching venue, and display area.

Thanks to research and tutelage from the society’s 40-some members, Eddie can spend an entire Saturday in his studio, refining ongoing projects and starting new ones.

Eddie likes to work with stones that polish very well—jasper, flint, and feldspars, for example. They are stones with good luster that are ideal for use as jewelry and mounting on silver. These stones should be reserved for more experienced lapidaries. Eddie suggests novices start out with simpler stones, such as one of the area’s richest mineral resources—Ohio flint.

Mineral collectors from all over the United States travel to Flint Ridge in eastern Licking and western Muskingum counties for the rock, which is ideal for use in a typical beginner’s project—a cabochon, or a gemstone that has been shaped and polished rather than faceted, or cut.rock.sample

The stone’s rich pink, yellow and blue tinges, combined with sporadic streaks of quartz, make for a specimen that’s easy to handle and appealing to the eye when polished correctly, Eddie said.

As a lapidary gains more experience, Eddie said, it’s customary to move on to minerals that are a little more delicate and unpredictable—moonstones and labradorites—stones that must be handled with imagination and patience.

“When you start cutting and grinding, you don’t want to cut or grind too far. A lot of stones we call ‘leave-rights.’ You want to find that which is unique about the stone; that’s what you work out.”

“It’s understanding what you can bring out of the stone. You have some stones that are just small pieces, so you have to find a way to transform them into something that’s interesting and lasting.”

Lapidaries often travel all over the country and world to acquire specimens. Society members have taken group field trips to upstate New York, Missouri and Iowa to forage minerals unique to the locations. Raw samples are also available through mail order and from dealers at local shows. It’s a lot easier to pick up a sample of labradorite from a dealer than to travel to Paul’s Island, Labrador, Canada—the only region the mineral is found—to pick up a slab of the stone.

Labradorite and stones like it are tricky to work with because they are comprised of sections of varying iridescence. That is, when held at different angles to a light, different sections of the rock will appear to light up. The trick is to cut the stone down to a piece that is uniformly illuminated at a given angle.

This is one of the reasons it’s so hard to assign even a rough estimate to how long it takes to finish a given project. Each stone is different, both physically and chemically, Eddie explained. With easy-to-handle minerals, he can polish six stones in four hours, but he has devoted more than 20 hours of studio time to fabricating a single labradorite bola tie.

Some samples can be so tricky to work with that Eddie will put a project on hold until he can consult fellow rock hounds in the gem and mineral society.

“Every once in a while you want to talk to someone seasoned,” Eddie said. “That’s what’s good about being with people who have shared experiences.”

Another benefit to having the society nearby is the array of stone working tools the members have collectively acquired. While Eddie has only a small saw and grinder in his Fayette studio, members plan to install larger, harder to obtain equipment in the new  downtown Morenci clubhouse. This will also give novice lapidaries a chance to get involved in the hobby without spending a lot of money, he said.

The Stateline Gem and Mineral Society’s 46th annual jewelry, rock and mineral show is scheduled this weekend in the Junior Fair Building at the Fulton County Fair Grounds in Wauseon.

The show will feature a number of educational courses, including a soap stone carving course, a class about making woven jewelry and a bead making class. A number of educational demonstrations are also scheduled.

This year’s show also marks the society’s first ever bead rally with beads from six skilled craftsmen scheduled to be on sale and display.

The show is scheduled from noon to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free.

    – May 31, 2007 
  • Front.bridge Cross
    STEP BY STEP—Wyatt Stevens of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge Sunday during the Michigan DNR’s Great Outdoors Jamboree at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The Tecumseh Boy Scout Troop constructed the bridge again this year after taking a break in 2016. The Jamboree offered a variety of activities for a wide range of age groups. Morenci’s Stair District Library set up activities again this year and had visits with dozens of kids. See the back page for additional photos.
  • Front.bridge.17
    LEADING THE WAY—The Morenci Area High School marching band led the way across the pedestrian bridge on Morenci’s south side for the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk. The Band Boosters shared profits from the sale of T-shirts with the walk’s sponsor, the Morenci Area Chamber of Commerce. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.eclipse
    LOOKING UP—More than 200 people showed up at Stair District Library Monday afternoon to view the big celestial event with free glasses provided by a grant from the Space Science Institute. The library offered craft activities from noon to 1 p.m., refreshments including Cosmic Cake from Zingerman’s Bakehouse and a live viewing of the eclipse from NASA on a large screen. As the sky darkened slightly, more and more people moved outside to the sidewalk to take a look at the shrinking sun. If you missed it, hang on for the next total eclipse in 2024 as the path comes even closer to this area.
  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Front.batter

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017