2012.06.06 Alice Butler: Remembering Jack Bailey

Written by David Green.

My daughter, Lorraine Pillow, taught school in Morenci. She recently retired and when her husband, a Methodist minister, was transferred they moved to Elkton, Mich., a small town in the thumb area. She still receives the State Line Observer because of her continued interest in the people of Morenci.

The May 2 issue of the Observer had a story in “By the Way” on the old TV program, Queen for a Day. Knowing this article would be of interest to me, she saved the copy for me and she was right, I was interested.

Jack Bailey grew up in a small town—Hampton, Iowa—where my father was the Superintendent of Schools. I think Jack was raised an only child by a single mother, but I cannot be sure of that. He was in high school when I was in grade school. He had high ambitions which did not include a high school education, much to his mother’s dismay. I know that many a time his mother came to Dad begging him to see that Jack stayed in school until graduation. Sometimes she would be in tears over what to do with him. I was too young to know details. 

As a high school student, Jack produced a musical at the local theater, which had to close down for his production, called the Follies of 193_. I don’t remember the year, it seems like 1932 or 1936, but the musical was a huge success. I think I was the youngest member of the dance team and I still remember the song we sang and the dance we did. This production was probably the start of his career and kept Jack in school until graduation.

On to Hollywood. We sort of kept track of his progress. I know he had the fame he desired. Mother and Dad went to one of his shows—he asked Mother if she wanted to be the Queen that particular night, but she declined. I don’t know if the program was rigged or not, but obviously she could have been substituted had she wanted the honor.

I know he liked his liquor and I think that was what took his life, but this part is gossip for I only heard it, not as fact. I was away from home by that time.

I just thought you might like to know this about Jack Bailey whom you featured in a story. Thank you for bringing forth memories for me.

– Alice (Rankin) Butler

St. Clair, Mich.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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