The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2012.04.04 Keith Pennington: Goals for our kids

Written by David Green.

As I cross paths with other parents, it is common for the conversation to quickly turn to what is happening in the lives of our kids. When we were younger, we were eager to share our children’s most basic accomplishments. We bought a baby book where we not only recorded our baby’s weight and length but also our baby’s first words and first steps.

As our children entered elementary school, we watched our kids interact with other children.  We began to realize that while our kids had talents and abilities in some areas, other children were more developed in other ways. No one child excelled at everything but we began to aspire for our children to improve in areas where they were lagging behind others.

As the kids grew into Jr. High, sports turned from “everybody gets to play” to “competition” to play. Naturally, as parents we wanted our kids to be able to improve and continue to compete. We spent hours playing catch and shooting hoops hoping to improve their technique. We couldn’t play the piano but we made sure our kids took lessons. 

With high school our children lost some enthusiasm for competition. They didn’t need to be on a sports team to be accepted. They certainly didn’t need to be at the top academically. They just wanted to hang with their friends.

Our parental alarm bells started ringing loudly. Don’t our kids know that they have to work harder than everyone else just to get ahead? Don’t they know that the whole goal of a successful life builds on each decision they make today?

What makes a successful life? I don’t think it is being the best ball player, graduating at the top of the class or making the most money.  As a parent, my highest aspiration is that my children have a lifetime filled with hope and inner peace.  What could be more important?

What do you hope for your children?  Are you spending sufficient time guiding them to your highest aspiration for them? This Sunday we celebrate Easter and there is no better time to bring your family to church and introduce them to a future of hope and peace. Whether your children are five or fifty-five, help them understand what you believe is important. I’ll be at the Morenci Church of the Nazarene and I hope to see you there.

– Keith Pennington

Silver Creek Dr., Morenci

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