2011.06.29 Keith Pennington: Volunteering is community

Written by David Green.

The Town & Country Festival wrapped up this weekend with a near-capacity crowd on a perfect evening for outdoor fun. Many took advantage of the planned activities, left their traditional routine behind and made time to get to know their neighbors a little better at the festival. 

These opportunities don’t come along very often and they don’t happen without a lot of effort by volunteers. It was no coincidence that many of the yellow-shirted volunteers looked a little battle-worn by Saturday evening. For them the festival marked the end of months of preparation. Be sure to tell them “Thank you.”

As Colleen Leddy correctly pointed out in her “Midnight Musings” column in last week’s paper, “the essence of this town is the people.” The volunteers of the Morenci area set it apart from many larger communities. We realize that government and industry cannot provide everything needed for a strong community and that much would be lost without a strong corps of volunteers.

Opportunities to volunteer occur all year long. There are clubs, churches and service organizations that plan to serve on a regular basis. They provide an excellent opportunity to help you plug in to your community with projects and resources that accomplish things that we cannot do on our own. Get involved in service organizations.

Most often volunteers are simply people seeing a need and then filling it. The idea that “that’s someone else’s job” or “why doesn’t someone do something about that” never crosses their minds. If we pay attention we can see opportunities to serve and take note of people serving. Both are important.

I’ve noted some people serving nondescriptly in recent days. Crop Production Services sent a couple workers out with a truck picking up brush for a couple days assisting their community. They saw a need and filled it. Saturday I noticed a bunch of pamphlets blowing in the street in front of the car wash a couple of hours after the parade. It was quite a mess and then I saw a Morenci policeman park his car and work several minutes to clean it up. It wasn’t “his job” but he saw a need and filled it.

Thank you, citizens, who “see a need and fill it.” You make a difference here every day.

– Keith Pennington,

Mayor of Morenci

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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