2010.09.29 Robyn Taylor: Float-building tradition

Written by David Green.

As our school prepares for the upcoming homecoming events, they will not be preparing to build their floats.

What a sad time when our school traditions are just tossed aside as if they didn’t matter.

When remembering my children’s and my own years at MHS, the excitement of homecoming week was more than one lucky girl being crowned homecoming queen.

Homecoming was about a whole week of excitement, spirit week, pep rally, the game, crowning a queen, and yes, the excitement to see if your class won the best float. It was a time to do something as a class, to accomplish something exciting together, and the underclassmen always trying to outdo the seniors. This was something everyone could be involved in, not just the jocks and popular kids.

Pep rallies are great fun, but it’s the same kids getting to participate in the games, while everyone else sits and watches. Floats were done by everyone that wanted to be a part of it. We wonder why we see no school spirit, but yet the things that create school spirit are the very things that are being tossed aside.

Homecoming parades were not just to get the school in the spirit of homecoming, but also to create excitement in the community. It brought community and school together. The joy on the elementary kids’ faces while they watched the high schoolers roll by and thought I can’t wait until I’m old enough to do that.

Main Street traffic stopping as the homecoming parade came through, patrons, business owners, and residents stopping for a brief moment to cheer and watch the excitement in our youth’s eyes as they proudly wore their football jerseys, and cheerleading uniforms. The classes excited about their float they created together. Creating excitement in the community.

  The largest crowds are always at the homecoming game. Not just for the crowning of the queen or the game, but for everything that is associated with homecoming. The cheers for the queen, the touchdowns, and yes, the winning float. We come to see it all.

The decision to no longer have floats as a homecoming tradition doesn’t only effect those in high school now, it will effect everyone who goes through those halls from now on. Once you take something away you never bring it back. Maybe not everyone wants to be a part of this tradition, but many still do and many in the future will never get the chance.

Please keep our traditions at MHS alive! Stand when you hear your school song being played, cheer on our teams, bring back our floats and parade, and join community and school once again.

I know I’m proud to be an MHS alumni and the traditions it has.

– Robyn Taylor

Pearl Street, Morenci

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