2010.08.18 Correspondence from Barbara Tadda

Written by David Green.

Fayette native Barbara Ford Tadda writes a President’s Message in the monthly newsletter for a hospital volunteer board in New Port Richey, Fla. Following is her most recent column.

My husband and I just flew to Northwest Ohio for my high school alumni reunion, staying with my best high school girlfriend and her husband for two weeks. We stood up at each other’s weddings, our husbands who are from two different worlds are exactly alike, and our kids have had and still have a great relationship.

If you think your friends from elementary school, high school and college are friends from the past and should stay friends of the past; think again!  A high school reunion or alumni reunion is an excellent opportunity to reminisce with friends and catch up with old acquaintances. If one is in the working field, it is a great place to network as the friendships and connections are priceless. Classmates stay connected today on Facebook, MySpace, e-mail and many other popular on-line sites.

When my mother and her class celebrated 50 years at an alumni high school reunion, I thought she was really old.  When I attended my 50th reunion a few years ago, I suddenly became my mother, of all things, and didn't feel that old. Also, the insecure plain Jane Wallflowers and total nerds are now on the same level as the band majorette, head cheerleader, class basketball/football stars, student council president, and in most cases, they really look better.  As you get older, the past fades and anyone hanging on to their “old glory days” looks the most pathetic.

 Having gone to previous class and alumni reunions, I was really excited about going this year as the town built a new school, K through 12, and the reunion was held during the day in the school.  Tours of the school were taken before the catered lunch and program.  With the alumni reunion during the day, individual classes were able to spend the evening together.

 The following weekend was the town’s annual festival which many of us out-of-towners stayed to enjoy.  Everyone attends the street parade, then a chicken barbecue in the park. There are games of all kinds, musical entertainment, hand-made crafts, food and drink vendors, and the end of the evening with a fireworks display.

 We happily return home to New Port Richey, looking forward to seeing many of my hometown alumni when they come down to Florida for the winter, and we annually all get together on the second Tuesday in March for lunch and a program.  Friends are precious!

 – Barbara Tadda

  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
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    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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