The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2009.10.28 Clark Emmons: Support Issue 2

Written by David Green.

With all due respect to my friend Dave Blesing, Ohio Issue 2 does not take away his or anyone else’s right to vote. Let’s dial back the emotion for just a moment and do a quick fact check.

For starters, Issue 2 makes no changes to Ohio’s ballot initiative law and constitutional amendment processes. Secondly, Issue 2 in no way restricts the power of the Ohio General Assembly. Finally, if Dave or anyone else disagrees with the outcome of Issue 2, he can fight it out in the Ohio court system.

To see for yourself what Issue 2 is really about, Google “Ohio senate joint resolution 6,” click on the first result and read the full text of the proposed legislation. It’s a single page and written in plain English.

Issue 2 proposes a constitutional amendment to provide for the creation of a thirteen member,  Ohio  livestock care standards board. The board must consist of the state director of agriculture, the dean of an Ohio ag college, a food safety expert, a county humane society representative, two Ohio consumers, two statewide farm organization representatives, two state licensed veterinarians and three family farmers.

The obvious question is why do we need or want this?  We don’t! But, it’s the lesser of two evils.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has informed the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation that it intends to seek its own ballot initiative in Ohio on the 2010 ballot. Their initiative would create a constitutional amendment that would ban several common livestock practices in the state.

HSUS is a humane society in name only. It operates no pet shelters or adoption facilities anywhere in the U.S. and contributes less than 4% of its substantial budget to organizations that operate dog and cat shelters. In fact, HSUS is the largest and richest animal rights lobbying organization, with an operating budget of $91.5 million in 2007 and net assets exceeding $200 million. Despite the fact that they say it is a problem, HSUS funds no research on farm animal care.

Their real agenda is to end all meat consumption. The HSUS factory farming home page directly advocates for veganism. Their factory farm campaign manager, Paul Shapiro, told a recent conference that, “nothing is more important than promoting veganism.” With offices in San Francisco, Hollywood, New York City and Washington, D.C., they are a fund raising machine.

If you’re still up in the air on which way to vote on Issue 2, it’s pretty simple. Who do you want deciding what constitutes humane treatment for our farm animals, San Francisco vegetarians or Ohio veterinarians?

Get the facts...be informed...vote yes on Issue 2!

 – Clark Emmons

Chesterfield township dairy farmer

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