2009.10.28 Clark Emmons: Support Issue 2

Written by David Green.

With all due respect to my friend Dave Blesing, Ohio Issue 2 does not take away his or anyone else’s right to vote. Let’s dial back the emotion for just a moment and do a quick fact check.

For starters, Issue 2 makes no changes to Ohio’s ballot initiative law and constitutional amendment processes. Secondly, Issue 2 in no way restricts the power of the Ohio General Assembly. Finally, if Dave or anyone else disagrees with the outcome of Issue 2, he can fight it out in the Ohio court system.

To see for yourself what Issue 2 is really about, Google “Ohio senate joint resolution 6,” click on the first result and read the full text of the proposed legislation. It’s a single page and written in plain English.

Issue 2 proposes a constitutional amendment to provide for the creation of a thirteen member,  Ohio  livestock care standards board. The board must consist of the state director of agriculture, the dean of an Ohio ag college, a food safety expert, a county humane society representative, two Ohio consumers, two statewide farm organization representatives, two state licensed veterinarians and three family farmers.

The obvious question is why do we need or want this?  We don’t! But, it’s the lesser of two evils.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) has informed the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation that it intends to seek its own ballot initiative in Ohio on the 2010 ballot. Their initiative would create a constitutional amendment that would ban several common livestock practices in the state.

HSUS is a humane society in name only. It operates no pet shelters or adoption facilities anywhere in the U.S. and contributes less than 4% of its substantial budget to organizations that operate dog and cat shelters. In fact, HSUS is the largest and richest animal rights lobbying organization, with an operating budget of $91.5 million in 2007 and net assets exceeding $200 million. Despite the fact that they say it is a problem, HSUS funds no research on farm animal care.

Their real agenda is to end all meat consumption. The HSUS factory farming home page directly advocates for veganism. Their factory farm campaign manager, Paul Shapiro, told a recent conference that, “nothing is more important than promoting veganism.” With offices in San Francisco, Hollywood, New York City and Washington, D.C., they are a fund raising machine.

If you’re still up in the air on which way to vote on Issue 2, it’s pretty simple. Who do you want deciding what constitutes humane treatment for our farm animals, San Francisco vegetarians or Ohio veterinarians?

Get the facts...be informed...vote yes on Issue 2!

 – Clark Emmons

Chesterfield township dairy farmer

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016