Mental illness, keeping up with the Joneses, and advertisements 2015.01.14

Written by David Green.

By DANNY KALIS

I’ve always been fascinated by psychology, but this week I came across an article that really made me stop to think. The article was about a study conducted in Minnesota that found high school students today to be five times more likely to suffer from a mental illness than those tested by the same criteria in 1938. How could that be?

The students surveyed in 1938 would have lived their last decade through the greatest economic depression in the history of the United States, and also would be right on the verge of World War II. Why would kids today be more likely to suffer from mental illness than kids in one of the most difficult times in our country’s existence? 

As of this writing, there appears to be no definitive way to explain it. I was taught in psychology classes that mental illness can be a combination of both nature and nurture. While heredity may play some involvement in susceptibility, I am a staunch believer in nurture (the environment we’re raised in) being the real culprit. A majority of scholars are quick to blame the parents, but I believe that to be an unfair indictment. Many people (especially those with a bit of age) believe that kids today are simply wimps. We whine and pout when we don’t get our way. We want everything handed to us. I hate to admit it, but I think they’re closer to the truth than we would like to admit. 

That might even explain it if the problem stopped when we grow up, but it doesn’t. The National Institute of Mental Health released an estimate that 43.7 million adult Americans have at least one mental illness. Thinking that statistic to be extreme; I decided to check some other reputable sources. SAMHSA (The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) released a study in early 2011 which states that nearly 25 percent of all adults in the U.S. have at least one mental illness, almost 45 million people. These studies were conducted independently and found remarkably similar results. So the problem definitely exists, but why? 

From the time I was a little boy, advertisements have taught me what I want out of life. Every site I’ve researched for this column bombarded me with advertisements. Microsoft Word, where I type this, has a large advertisement in the bottom right corner. These various advertisements try to convince me that I need their products to be happy, which really means to be more like (or better than) the Joneses. I am now a grown up, and I have never stopped to consider: What if I don’t want to be like the Joneses? 

I currently work 60+ hours a week to afford a car that I use mostly to drive back and forth to work. I buy my children over-priced toys, made in a foreign sweat-shop, because that’s how parents are taught to show love. On holidays and anniversaries I buy my wife flowers and jewelry, because that shows I love her, right?

It’s not like advertisers would benefit from brainwashing people into believing that love and happiness are obtainable only with their products. I took some time this week and actually paid attention to the ads. Many of them didn’t even sell their own products; instead, they sell attractive people with expensive things and associate their product with that lifestyle.

I plan on switching careers very soon to a less time-consuming job, even if it means fewer almighty dollars, to spend more time with my family. I sat on the floor and played with my 3-year-old son today, building nonsensical things with little blocks. He turned to me and said, “This is so much fun. I love you, daddy.”

I don’t have all the solutions. I do, however, believe that we should all take a step back and think about what we really want, not what corporations tell us we want. I think that a huge reason that mental illness is on the rise is because we try to buy love and happiness, instead of getting down on the floor with the ones we love and earning it.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
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    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
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    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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