Mental illness, keeping up with the Joneses, and advertisements 2015.01.14

Written by David Green.

By DANNY KALIS

I’ve always been fascinated by psychology, but this week I came across an article that really made me stop to think. The article was about a study conducted in Minnesota that found high school students today to be five times more likely to suffer from a mental illness than those tested by the same criteria in 1938. How could that be?

The students surveyed in 1938 would have lived their last decade through the greatest economic depression in the history of the United States, and also would be right on the verge of World War II. Why would kids today be more likely to suffer from mental illness than kids in one of the most difficult times in our country’s existence? 

As of this writing, there appears to be no definitive way to explain it. I was taught in psychology classes that mental illness can be a combination of both nature and nurture. While heredity may play some involvement in susceptibility, I am a staunch believer in nurture (the environment we’re raised in) being the real culprit. A majority of scholars are quick to blame the parents, but I believe that to be an unfair indictment. Many people (especially those with a bit of age) believe that kids today are simply wimps. We whine and pout when we don’t get our way. We want everything handed to us. I hate to admit it, but I think they’re closer to the truth than we would like to admit. 

That might even explain it if the problem stopped when we grow up, but it doesn’t. The National Institute of Mental Health released an estimate that 43.7 million adult Americans have at least one mental illness. Thinking that statistic to be extreme; I decided to check some other reputable sources. SAMHSA (The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) released a study in early 2011 which states that nearly 25 percent of all adults in the U.S. have at least one mental illness, almost 45 million people. These studies were conducted independently and found remarkably similar results. So the problem definitely exists, but why? 

From the time I was a little boy, advertisements have taught me what I want out of life. Every site I’ve researched for this column bombarded me with advertisements. Microsoft Word, where I type this, has a large advertisement in the bottom right corner. These various advertisements try to convince me that I need their products to be happy, which really means to be more like (or better than) the Joneses. I am now a grown up, and I have never stopped to consider: What if I don’t want to be like the Joneses? 

I currently work 60+ hours a week to afford a car that I use mostly to drive back and forth to work. I buy my children over-priced toys, made in a foreign sweat-shop, because that’s how parents are taught to show love. On holidays and anniversaries I buy my wife flowers and jewelry, because that shows I love her, right?

It’s not like advertisers would benefit from brainwashing people into believing that love and happiness are obtainable only with their products. I took some time this week and actually paid attention to the ads. Many of them didn’t even sell their own products; instead, they sell attractive people with expensive things and associate their product with that lifestyle.

I plan on switching careers very soon to a less time-consuming job, even if it means fewer almighty dollars, to spend more time with my family. I sat on the floor and played with my 3-year-old son today, building nonsensical things with little blocks. He turned to me and said, “This is so much fun. I love you, daddy.”

I don’t have all the solutions. I do, however, believe that we should all take a step back and think about what we really want, not what corporations tell us we want. I think that a huge reason that mental illness is on the rise is because we try to buy love and happiness, instead of getting down on the floor with the ones we love and earning it.

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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