Mail Delivery: The changes don't look good 2013.02.13

Written by David Green.

The vast majority of Observer readers prefer newsprint over the digital version of the paper. The majority of those newsprint readers live in an area of fast mail delivery where their paper arrives on Wednesday and in a few cases Thursday.

For the rest of you, there's bad news on the horizon. Actually, some bad news may have already begun.

We're sure you've heard the news that Saturday mail delivery is scheduled to cease in August. Those of you who generally receive your Observer on Saturday will have to wait until Monday. Those of who find a paper in their mailbox the following week will soon have to add yet another day as the mail wends its way to your house.

The U.S. Postal Service aims to continue Saturday delivery of packages, but the value of other mailed items is shrinking. Our costs to mail the paper continue to rise as the Postal Service raises prices sometimes more than once a year. We will soon lose a day of service, but will our mailing prices decrease? Of course not.

The so-called "snail mail" offered by the Postal Service has taken a heavy blow through the growth of electronic communication, but a 2006 decision by Congress accounts for about 70 percent of the Postal Service's financial woes. The agency is the only one overseen by Congress that was required to pre-pay employee benefits to such a far-reaching extent. The Postal Service was given 10 years to cover benefits for the next 75 years—for employees not even yet hired.

We're not suggesting that everything in the postal system is run efficiently—far from it—but it's no surprise that financial troubles would arise from Congress's mandate.

We mentioned earlier that another delivery problem might already be underway. A significant change was made last month that re-routes mail to a large facility in Detroit for initial sorting. Until last week, we sent a bag of papers for the west side of the state to Grand Rapids for sorting. Another bag covered the east side of the state and another was separated for a portion of Florida.

Now it all goes straight to Detroit in one container. That might be good, but our guess is that further delays are ahead. Big is not always better, and we wonder if there will be more of an opportunity for bags of newspapers to remain off to the side waiting their turn to enter the mail stream.

It seems that the Postal Service is only hurting itself further with each big change that it makes.

  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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