One year later: Resolution of Skelton saga needed 2011.11.30

Written by David Green.

Thumbing through old issues of the Observer from last fall shows daily life in a small Midwestern community. The band plays at football game intermissions. A kitten is rescued from a sewer. Guests arrive for a special library program. Preparations are made for the annual community Thanksgiving meal.

And then it hits.

The first issue of December tells the story of the disappearance of three young brothers. It’s a story that no one expects to happen here or in any small town in America.

It’s a story of shock and disbelief that touches everyone in the community, and now, a year later, it’s a story of an unresolved tragedy.

For family members and close friends, it’s something that’s been on their minds every day of the year. Others may remember only occasionally, such as when they drive through the neighborhood or pass a yellow ribbon on a downtown light pole, but everyone, no matter how close they are to the family, shares in the outrage.

Perhaps the community has changed through the Skelton brothers’ disappearance. Maybe we’ve had a strong lesson in appreciating our children. We’ve learned to push aside some of our personal wants and come together to help others.

The boys’ mother, Tanya Zuvers, hopes and prays there won’t be a second anniversary of her sons’ disappearance. She, like so many others, wants the matter to be resolved.

Many people were astounded Sunday afternoon to learn the Skelton boys are three of nearly 3,100 Michigan residents who have disappeared and remain unaccounted for. Many have been missing for 10, 20 and more years.

Those statistics point toward the possibility that a resolution might not come for a long time, no matter how diligent the efforts of law enforcement personnel.

In the meantime, the yellow ribbons remain visible in town and people will continue to fear the worst while holding out hope for the best.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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