The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2012.03.07 Good-bye, loyal Buick; Hello, car of the future

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

I can hardly believe I’m writing these words, but after nearly eight years of meritorious service, my faithful Park Avenue has gone to a better place. At least, I hope it’s a better place. At just under 179,000 miles, it certainly deserves a rest.

Last Tuesday, it went into the car dealership for a simple oil change and received a death sentence—well, almost. It turned out it needed one major repair with another quickly bearing down on it.  That’s the kind of news that keeps people away from doctors—the fear of hearing “You really need a heart transplant. And if you don’t get it, the lung cancer I diagnosed will kill you instead.” And neither I nor, I assume, my Buick saw its demise coming.

 Either repair was in the neighborhood of the total value of the car to an unbiased onlooker. It really didn’t make sense for me to repair it, no matter the Buick’s sentimental value. It would be up to someone with more mechanical skills than I to take it on as a project, or (and it horrifies me to think about this option) part it out, one nearly new Goodyear tire, $100 hubcap and 3.8 liter V-6 engine at a time.

Yes, I know I’m probably making a bigger deal out of this than I should. I can almost hear someone saying, “It’s only a car!” But after seven less-than-ideal vehicles in a row, the Buick was a nice change. 

For one thing, it often went months, even a year or more, with no professional attention needed other than oil changes. It didn’t rust away before my eyes, like my 1987 Ford Aerostar. It didn’t have a steering rack nearly drop out on the road, like happened to my 1981 Plymouth Reliant on a trip to Toledo. 

It didn’t spend days (even two weeks on one occasion) in the dealership while factory engineers ran experiments on it, like my 1985 Ford Tempo. And even though it had a bit of an oil leak the last few years, the Buick never went through two quarts of 10W40 a month like my 1985 Chevy, the storied deer-smacking Caprice.

The toughest part of letting the Park Avenue go was emptying it of my personal possessions. I never let it get full of empty pop cans or fast food wrappers like some people, but you still tend to accumulate a lot of stuff in eight years.

Take, for instance, the bottle of Tums in the glove compartment. I remember having a roll or two in most of my cars. Apparently, the reliability of the Buick must have cured any stomach upsets caused by previous vehicles. The bottle was two years past its expiration and still unopened. 

And one final surprise from the Park Avenue. Several years ago, I lost a half dollar between the seats. For months afterward, I would sometimes move the power seats forward, hoping the coin would have worked its way free, but always to no avail. This last day, under the passenger seat lay the half dollar, with a penny for a companion, a final gift from a fine automobile.

In turning the car over to the dealership, I told one of the service technicians there was a cassette stuck in the stereo that I wouldn’t mind having back if they were able to extricate it. “A cassette?” he asked. “What is it, Jimi Hendrix?”

No, not Jimi, just a one-hit wonder from the early 1990s. Probably more desirable than the music itself was the RCA “Nipper” logos printed on each side of the cassette.

I did remember to retrieve my Billy Idol compact disc from the stereo, so the last CD played in the Park Avenue became the first one played in my latest car, a 2006 Buick Lucerne.

The Lucerne was Buick’s replacement for the Park Avenue, so I’m staying with a close relative as its successor. It doesn’t have a cassette player like the Park Avenue, but the stereo has 36 radio station preset slots, at least 26 more than I’m likely to use.

It’s also the most polite vehicle I’ve ever owned. When you start it, the digital readout changes from a totally lit screen to reveal the words “Buick Lucerne,” just in case you forgot its name.

Even better, when I started it Saturday, after introducing itself, it warned me of possible icy roads. That was pretty impressive. While I was sleeping, it was apparently studying the weather. I’m still going to miss the Park Avenue, but so far, the Lucerne is doing its best to prove itself a worthy replacement.

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