2012.01.11 Notable year for dogs, crocs, birds and more

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

I’m hoping 2012 will be another year of animals in the news. They’re fun to write about and opposed to humans, unlikely to send whiny, complaining letters to the editor. I just wish I knew what happened to some of 2011’s famous animals, like, for instance, Gena the crocodile. 

Last winter, Gena swallowed a cell phone dropped by a careless visitor to his aquarium home in Ukraine. Aquarium workers could hear the phone ringing in the poor reptile’s stomach. When the story made the news, Gena had not eaten in a month and no longer was playing with his croc friends. A risky operation to remove the phone was considered (and actually performed, according to one account). Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to track down any updates on Gena.

Sometimes, I wish I didn’t know the rest of the story. I was happy to hear about the steer that escaped from a meat-processing facility. Upon arrival at the plant near Mount Pleasant, the steer discovered an open door and hoofed it to freedom, at least temporarily.

He was nearly caught at a Burger King some distance away (the article doesn’t say whether or not he ordered a Whopper), but escaped again, crossing a five-lane highway before being killed by police who claimed the steer was “large, agitated and dangerous.” I can’t say I blame the steer for being agitated. Wouldn’t you be?

A sad fate also awaited Andre the sea turtle. Found stranded on a sandbar off the Florida coast in June of 2010, Andre suffered from a variety of injuries including holes in his shell (apparently from boat strikes), a collapsed lung, an exposed spinal cord, plus an infection and pneumonia.

Several new procedures were developed to care for and rehabilitate Andre, and after 14 months, he was released back into the ocean. Just three weeks later, his body was discovered on a nearby island. A tag placed on him before his release confirmed his identity, but he was in such bad condition, a cause of death couldn’t be determined.

An emperor penguin found ill in New Zealand thousands of miles from its Antarctic home similarly died just a few days after being released following treatment.

Birds also grabbed a share of news in 2011. A Jackson man was sentenced to 10 months in jail for parrot abuse. He was carrying it in a backpack in Ann Arbor when witnesses reported that he shook it so hard that feathers were scattering. He told police he was “disciplining and training” the parrot.

It’s too bad he wasn’t sentenced to serve his time in a Brazilian prison which added two geese to its security force. The warden of the Sobral prison said the geese make a lot of noise when they sense “strange movements,” alerting guards to potential problems.

A veterinarian in Oregon saved an injured bald eagle by performing “mouth to beak” resuscitation. The eagle, which had been found in June with a dislocated shoulder and paralyzed right leg, was under anesthesia during physical therapy when it stopped breathing. Dr. Jeff Cooney was able to revive the eagle, who was lucky Cooney knew CPR.

Meanwhile, England is being invaded by thousands of rose-ringed parakeets, native to India and Africa. It is believed that initially they either escaped from bird cages or were released by owners. But scientists can’t yet explain how they are multiplying so fast.

The English population was estimated at 1,500 in 1995. Ten years later, that number had jumped to 30,000. The parakeets ravage crops in India, but so far, the British contingent seems happy raiding bird feeders. 

And finally, every dog may not have its day, but one finally received his own postage stamp. Owney, mascot of the Post Office’s Railway Mail Service in the late 1800s, was famous for traveling the country and, eventually, the world, in train cars carrying the mail. 

Owney collected hundreds, if not thousands, of metal mailbag tags during his travels, many of which were displayed on a harness given to him by Postmaster General John Wanamaker. Owney was shot and killed in Toledo in 1897 (details of the circumstances are sketchy) and his mail clerk friends paid to have him preserved. In 1911, the Postal Service transferred Owney’s body to the Smithsonian Institution and his 100th year there was marked on July 27th with a stamp in his honor.    

That sounds like a nice tribute to Owney. Now if only they’d make a crocodile-shaped cell phone to honor Gena.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

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