2011.01.26 Real winter just a check and plane flight away

Written by David Green.


Enjoying winter so far? I can’t say that the lack of blizzards has upset me any, but some of our local meteorologists seem to be feeling the pressure. 

I spent last Thursday in Adrian, where there were a few snow showers during the day. I returned home just in time for the 6:30 p.m. news, which announced a snowstorm which was “dumping” on the area. When it was time to give details, they admitted “most of our viewing area received a trace to a half inch.” Doesn’t sound like much of a “dump” to me. But if a lot of snow appeals to you, this is the year to visit Antarctica.

This December marks the 100th anniversary of Roald Amundsen reaching the South Pole, followed by Robert Falcon Scott’s arrival a month later in January 1912. According to a recent New York Times article hundreds of “tourists, adventurers and history buffs” are planning trips of their own to the pole, following the tracks of the two pioneers.

I can understand someone wanting to retrace Amundsen’s trip, but why Scott’s?  The British explorer not only lost out on the glory of being the first to the South Pole, but he and his entire party died on the return trip, victims of bad weather and inability to reach a stock of supplies. 

To me, following Scott’s journey is like gathering a group of your tastiest-looking friends and retracing the route of the Donner party. Yet two teams of three men each plan to leave from the starting points of both Scott and Admundsen and race to the pole.

Besides the skiing option, some will attempt to drive to the pole by truck. There will also be airplane flights, some of which will land just short of the goal and allow you to ski a few miles to the pole, just like you accomplished something. That option costs $57,500. This strikes me as similar to someone building an elevator on Mount Everest which allows you to ride to the 2,900th floor, then get out and climb the final few feet.

Once at the pole, there’s not much to do. The National Science Foundation, which runs the research station at the pole, isn’t too excited about an onslaught of visitors. “We really don’t have a process for them other than letting them know that they are at the pole...and we’re not able to provide them with any amenities,” said Peter West of the NSF’s Office of Polar Programs.

Actually, the NSF does have a commissary at the station, which allows visitors to send mail, which will be delivered with a South Pole postmark, and yes, they do sell T-shirts. Probably something like “My friend froze to death at the South Pole and all I got was this lousy T-shirt.”

Most Antarctic tourism will be by cruise ship or sightseeing airplane for those less adventurous travelers. Even so, back in 1979, a sightseeing plane crashed into a mountain in Antarctica, killing all 257 persons aboard. You won’t find any mention of that in a flight brochure I downloaded.

The tour operator offers a variety of options aboard a chartered Quantas 747-400. Flights leave from Sydney and Melbourne and last approximately 12 hours depending on departure city and which of 19 different routings offers the best weather conditions. About three or four hours of the flight is over the continent coastline and includes flying over the South Magnetic Pole, but not the South Pole itself, which is another 1,500 miles or so away.

Tickets run from $999 to $6,799 with a variety of seating options and hospitality. For the $999 option, you spend the entire flight in the center row in Economy Class, which seems to mean you’re paying for a 12-hour flight which returns you to your starting point without your having seen a thing. 

Most of the other options also offer seat rotation, which gives you a window or next to window seat half of the flight and leaves you stuck on the aisle the rest. The $6,799 ticket is the only one offering a window seat the whole trip.

My favorite seating option is the Business Class Centre. For $2,999, “although they do not rotate to a window seat, full Business Class facilities, food and drinks are provided.” Yes, for 12 hours you can gorge yourself and drink until you’re stupid, while others on the ground are freezing. In explorer heaven, Robert Falcon Scott must be rolling in his grave.

  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

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