2010.09.22 "Summer of Bedbugs" is a good time to stay home

Written by David Green.

“Summer of Bedbugs” good time to stay home 

By RICH FOLEY

I’ve been dealing with some issues with my back for about six weeks now. As a result, I haven’t done much traveling, or getting out at all, except for work, during that time.

Normally, I would be a bit depressed about that, especially since I hadn’t yet taken a vacation this year and the window for warm, sunny days is slamming shut. But after seeing several television reports and reading a few newspaper stories, at least I can be thankful that I haven’t put myself at risk for encountering the dreaded bedbug.

Yes, bedbugs are not just a parental warning at bedtime anymore. This is starting to look like it’s a good year to be a shut-in. What’s even worse, it appears that Michigan and Ohio are two of the hot spots for infestations of the dreaded insects. And not only that, they are now showing up in places with no beds in sight.

Bedbugs used to be a problem confined to motels, apartment complexes and homes. But a New York Times article quotes pest control companies that have found them in “office buildings, movie theaters, clothing stores, food plants, factories and even airplanes.” That kind of cuts down on safe options to avoid the bugs, doesn’t it?

And how about airplanes being on the list? Wouldn’t you just love to be flying somewhere and discover bedbugs? It’s not like they can stop the plane like a taxi and let you off. How scary would the rest of that flight be? In fact, that gives me an idea for a movie: “Bedbugs on a Plane.” What do you think? Of course, since movie theaters are also on the list, who’s going to be brave enough to go see it? Maybe I’ll have to take it straight to video.

I’m not trying to scare you from leaving home, but according to the Times article, bedbugs could turn up anywhere. Abercrombie & Fitch had to close two stores in New York City in July for several days to deal with infestations, including disposing of an undisclosed amount of merchandise.

A San Francisco hotel estimates that dealing with bedbugs costs an extra $2,500 per incident. Their procedure includes removing the infested room and adjacent rooms from service, destroying their mattresses and cleaning and chemically treating the rooms.

In addition, the hotel has an employee called a “bedbug technician” whose job consists of going from room to room looking for bedbugs. As an extra precaution, the hotel offers a bounty of $10 paid to any employee who finds one.

The Orkin pest control company reports that their commercial business has tripled since 2008. Doing even better is the bedbug-sniffing beagle business. Yes, I said bedbug-sniffing beagles.

It seems the breed is the most popular to train for finding hidden bedbugs, and is the most effective detection technique. It costs about $250 for a dog to check out a 1,200 square foot store, up to $10,000 for a million square foot department store. Quarterly inspections are recommended.

The Times article tells about a woman who lost her job at Verizon and decided to enter the bedbug detection business. She bought a trained beagle and made back his cost in only three months, doing from one to three inspections per week.

Eliminating an infestation includes charges for killing the bugs, placing all the contents of the space into a heat chamber to kill any other bedbugs, plus spraying additional pesticide into the rooms before returning the contents.

Some lawyers are now starting to advertise themselves as specialists in bedbug litigation. A common target is rental companies, as many clients claim that rented furniture contained the bugs. Another lawyer has consulted on cases involving hotels, movie theaters, nursing homes and cruise ships. Cruise ships? I feel another movie idea coming on... 

Even though I’ve been feeling a lot better lately, after reading and watching all these bedbug stories, I’m not in any hurry to go on a plane, ship, or even to a hotel. But I’ve got another idea. Since I’ve learned that bedbugs die at 120 degrees, how about starting a resort inside a dome kept at, say, a constant 125 degrees? A little sweltering, for sure, but at least it would be bedbug free. On second thought, maybe I’ll just stay home a while longer.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.soccer.balls
    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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  • Shadow.salon

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