The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2010.04.07 Spring cleaning reveals my normalcy or lack thereof

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

 Now that winter appears to finally be behind us, it’s time to start thinking about spring cleaning. Note that I said thinking about cleaning, not actually tackling the job itself. Heck, after reading an AOL survey about home and personal cleanliness, I’m no longer sure where to start...or stop.

Having a good-sized, empty trash can might seem like a good place to begin, but not if I’m required to clean it, too. According to AOL’s cleaning expert, Dr. Philip Tierno, who is New York University’s Director of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, we should be cleaning our trash cans on a weekly basis.

Tierno recommends that we rinse the can with soap and water or a sanitizer such as bleach. Not doing so weekly may eventually leave you dealing with E. coli and salmonella. I’d think using a bag would eliminate the need for can cleaning, but apparently not.

When I moved to Fayette, I didn’t have room for the 30-gallon trash can I had used for 19+ years without benefit of cleaning (just a thousand or so new trash bags, replaced when full), so I passed it on to a friend. After checking with the can’s current owner, I confirmed it has now served for over 25 years and is still waiting for that first cleaning. I’m sure the doctor wouldn’t be happy about that, or the 15 percent of those surveyed who agree with my can cleaning schedule (or should I say, lack of one).

On the other hand, Dr. Tierno allows you to accumulate dirty dishes for two or three days before he starts getting nervous. That wouldn’t happen at my apartment. Not only would I not let dirty dishes sit that long, I’d run out of some items before that much time passed. Eighty-six percent of people surveyed by AOL do their dishes within a day. I guess Tierno is more concerned with the cleanliness of his trash can than his dishes. 
His food, though, that’s another matter. Tierno recommends that all fresh produce should, at a minimum, be soaked in a solution of water and citric acid. Only seven percent of those AOL surveyed always wash produce. 36 percent do sometimes and 57 percent never do. And where would we buy citric acid, even if we wanted to?

Now that Tierno’s food is clean, you wouldn’t see a great need to clean the refrigerator, would you? Not so fast. He thinks you should clean it every two weeks, unless you’ve had a spill. But if you clean up after spills and wash your food before you put it inside, I’d think you could go quite some time, couldn’t you? About 63 percent of us wait longer than Tierno recommends before cleaning. So there, doc.

I do agree with the doctor on how often to clean the tub (or shower) and toilet, namely weekly in both cases. But for the two percent of respondents who never clean their tub, and one percent who have never cleaned their toilet, pray they never invite you to their home. Come visit mine instead, as long as you don’t mind a little dust. Or maybe a lot.

Tierno recommends that you dust weekly or even every few days if you have allergies. Count me among the 71 percent who don’t do it that often. Sorry, doctor, some of us are too busy washing our dishes.

What really got my attention was Tierno’s comments about pillows. According to him, 10 percent of the weight of a five-year-old bed pillow is dust mites and dust mite debris. Tierno suggests throwing out the pillow at that point and covering the new ones with allergen-impermeable covers. Another suggestion was to buy washable pillows and wash them in hot water weekly.

A couple of years ago, I got one of those fancy, weirdly-shaped pillows designed to help you sleep better as a gift. I like it a lot. The survivor mate to the pillow it replaced is now something like 15 years old, perhaps 20. No wonder it seems to feel so heavy. If Doctor Tierno is right, by weight it’s about one half dust mites (or their dreaded debris).

I guess that means I should be disposing of it soon. It certainly sounds like a good idea. But if I do that, then I suppose I’ll have to scrub the newly-contaminated trash can afterward. It seems the more spring cleaning you do, the higher the likelihood the consequences will keep you busy until summer. Maybe I’ll just wait until fall. Sound good, doctor?

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