The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2010.03.10 Facebook: work of the Devil (or someone even more evil)

Written by David Green.

BY RICH FOLEY

I might be in a minority here, but I’ve grown to hate the internet social networking site Facebook. I’d probably feel the same way about all of them, but except for a brief fling with Twitter, that’s all I’m really familiar with.

I quickly gave up Twitter when I started getting numerous e-mails, all informing me that someone I had never heard of before was now following me. It appeared that most, if not all of them, had some agenda or other they hoped to broadcast to my followers. Citing “unusual activity,” Twitter itself deleted most of these, but I soon decided if I wanted my friends to know something, I could call or e-mail them directly, cutting out the middleman.

Facebook, on the other hand, seemed like a better option. I liked the idea of being able to search for people I’ve lost contact with and connect with them and current friends, all in one spot. It quickly turned out to be too good to be true.

I made the mistake of approving a college acquaintance as a friend and almost immediately grew tired of having to see every bit of boring information she could post. First each day, a report of what she had for breakfast and her ruminations about what to do after that. Mid-morning brought an update on her activities and what she was considering eating for lunch.

About two p.m., she’d report on her lunch and any afternoon plans. Around 4:30, it would be time for her to share her options for an evening meal. At 6:30 or 7:00, the after-dinner report and her thoughts on whether or not to take an evening stroll. If yes, she’d be sure to update afterwards with a tally of how far she walked. Any news from her friends or other family members I’ve never heard of would get their own bulletin.

Since I don’t get on-line every day, sometimes I’d find 20 or 30 messages from her when I signed into Facebook. Someone else that she suggested as a friend bombarded me nearly as much with those cute little cyber “gifts” and flowers and constant requests that I take some quiz or other. Between the two of them, I was reluctant to add anymore “friends.” Luckily, a real friend who knows the ins and outs of Facebook told me how I could de-friend them in return for adding him.

Another thing that bothers me is that Facebook is constantly encouraging you to reconnect with lost friends, but I’m finding out that some are better off lost. I recently made friend requests with two people I knew quite well in the late 1990s, only to have both claim they didn’t remember me. I don’t know about you, but I get uncomfortable trying to explain who I am to people that I remember extremely well. How do you answer that question? I did to the best of my ability, only to have both claim my further clarification didn’t help, either. That’s part of the reason why I only have eight Facebook friends.

At least that way, I’m only receiving a daily horoscope for one person, rather than dozens. Should I care what a friend’s horoscope says when I don’t even read my own? And why would I click to see my horoscope when I know that Facebook would then send it on to all my friends, none of whom could possibly care?

And then what do you do when good friends you’d never dream of dropping from your list get hooked on a ridiculous cyber time-waster that includes you receiving constant updates on their latest pretend exploits. Yes, I’m talking about FarmVille.

You just received a yellow ribbon for being such a good fake farmer? Yawn. And now you’ve received a red one, too? How not exciting that is to me. But wait—now you need help fertilizing your non-existent crops? Shouldn’t a yellow and red ribbon-winning cyber farmer be able to do this himself? I suppose I could forward you some manure in the form of your previous FarmVille updates. Would that help?

All this makes me wonder: Just who is behind Facebook, anyway? It occurs to me that the usual types of folks famous for bothering you at home aren’t as common as they used to be. Do you suppose Facebook is operated by an unholy trinity made up of the the Tupperware Company, Amway salespeople and Schwan’s delivery drivers, now bent on hounding us by computer? Maybe with a few magazine salespeople and cookie-pushing Girl Scouts thrown into the mix? I’m just asking: Who is the real Old McDonald behind FarmVille?

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