2009.11.18 Deer in the roadway may be least of worries

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

The deer hunting season is underway in Michigan, with Ohio’s turn soon to follow. As always, it’s a good idea to be alert on the roadways because those pesky deer can pop up at anytime. I got a shocking reminder of that a couple of weeks ago.

I was driving near the Adrian Mall when in my rear view mirror I saw an apparition from the past. It was my old 1985 Chevrolet Caprice, still displaying massive front end damage from a run-in with a behemoth of a deer nine years ago. 

I hadn’t seen the Chevy in three or four years and assumed it had long ago been shredded and shipped to China. Not the case, obviously. It would have been a perfect candidate for the Cash for Clunkers program, but dodged that bullet, too. I wish I could have stopped the driver to find out how many miles it now had and if it was still leaking oil in mass quantities. Instead, it only served as a reminder to watch for deer.

Or lots of other animals, too. No doubt you remember that several escaped cows from a farm near Lyons were involved in various vehicular accidents a few months ago. Then there was that poor young bear that was killed in a Fulton County crash a few years ago. How it ended up there, perhaps a couple hundred miles from the nearest bear habitat, was never explained.

Just last Thursday, the Henry County Sheriff’s Department reported goats on State Route 109. And Saturday, a friend and I watched a rat cross M-52 near downtown Manchester. Granted, a rat or even a goat wouldn’t do that much damage under normal circumstances, but sometimes circumstances turn out to be anything but normal.

Take, for example, the Texas man who last Wednesday drove his Bugatti Veyron, valued at over a million dollars, into a salt marsh near Galveston after being surprised by a low-flying pelican. He dropped his cellphone, reached to pick it up and drove into the marsh. When police arrived, the car was half-submerged in salt brine.

La Marque, Texas, police lieutenant Greg Gilchrist told the Associated Press that while he didn’t know if the French-made car was salvageable, “Salt water isn’t good for anything.” Smart man, give him a promotion. The pelican got away uninjured.

A week earlier, a couple driving their SUV home from church nearly slammed full speed into an 8-foot elephant crossing U. S. 81 near Enid, Oklahoma. At the last second, the driver swerved and only sideswiped the pachyderm.

The elephant, a 29-year-old female, suffered a broken tusk and leg wounds. The driver and his wife were unhurt. The SUV received shredded sheet metal damage where the elephant’s tusk broke through.

You’re waiting for an explanation as to why an elephant was running loose in central Oklahoma, aren’t you? Actually, it had escaped from a circus in the area. Once it recovers, I’ll bet it won’t try that again.

The website car-accidents.com carries many more stories of car-animal encounters. For instance, a Kansas man driving a Porsche 911 swerved into the oncoming lane to miss a pheasant flying toward his windshield. He hit a one-ton Dodge pickup head-on, fracturing both femurs, his right hip, left fibula, left foot, left radius, left ulna and numerous lesser injuries. The Porsche was ripped into three pieces. The pheasant got away. 

Then there was the English animal-lover who swerved to miss several rabbits in the road. He jumped a curb, demolished a lamp post and tree and rolled down an embankment. The fuel tank in his diesel Citroen burst, drenching him in diesel fuel. He suffered 12 broken ribs, two crushed vertebrae, a punctured lung, numerous internal injuries and various lacerations and bruises. The bunnies hopped away unscathed.

It’s nice to protect the animals, although most experts will tell you it’s safer to hit the animal than swerve. The drivers of the Porsche and Citroen no doubt would have been better off it they had hit the animals. The folks in Oklahoma, though, might have been killed if they hit the elephant head on. 

Sometimes, it’s hard to make that judgment. A few years ago, my sister chose to hit a raccoon in her lane rather than swerve. She was fine, and amazingly, the raccoon ran away to harass motorists another day. Her Mitsubishi Eclipse, on the other hand, suffered over $800 in cosmetic damage.

I think the moral of all this is pretty clear. Park your vehicle in the nearest lot, walk home slowly, and don’t trip over any animals on the way.

  • Homecoming Court
    HOMECOMING—One senior candidate will be chosen Morenci’s fall homecoming queen during half-time ceremonies Friday at the football field. In the back row are seniors Mikayla Price, who will be escorted by Mason Vaughn; Madison Bachman, escorted by Kiegan Merillat, and Mikayla Reinke, escorted by Griffin Grieder. Senior Ariana Roseman is absent from the photo. Her escort is Garrett Smith. In the front is sophomore Abbie White, who will be escorted by Ryder Price; junior Madysen Schmitz, escorted by Harley McCaskey and freshman Madison Keller, escorted by Jarett Cook.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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