2009.11.18 Deer in the roadway may be least of worries

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

The deer hunting season is underway in Michigan, with Ohio’s turn soon to follow. As always, it’s a good idea to be alert on the roadways because those pesky deer can pop up at anytime. I got a shocking reminder of that a couple of weeks ago.

I was driving near the Adrian Mall when in my rear view mirror I saw an apparition from the past. It was my old 1985 Chevrolet Caprice, still displaying massive front end damage from a run-in with a behemoth of a deer nine years ago. 

I hadn’t seen the Chevy in three or four years and assumed it had long ago been shredded and shipped to China. Not the case, obviously. It would have been a perfect candidate for the Cash for Clunkers program, but dodged that bullet, too. I wish I could have stopped the driver to find out how many miles it now had and if it was still leaking oil in mass quantities. Instead, it only served as a reminder to watch for deer.

Or lots of other animals, too. No doubt you remember that several escaped cows from a farm near Lyons were involved in various vehicular accidents a few months ago. Then there was that poor young bear that was killed in a Fulton County crash a few years ago. How it ended up there, perhaps a couple hundred miles from the nearest bear habitat, was never explained.

Just last Thursday, the Henry County Sheriff’s Department reported goats on State Route 109. And Saturday, a friend and I watched a rat cross M-52 near downtown Manchester. Granted, a rat or even a goat wouldn’t do that much damage under normal circumstances, but sometimes circumstances turn out to be anything but normal.

Take, for example, the Texas man who last Wednesday drove his Bugatti Veyron, valued at over a million dollars, into a salt marsh near Galveston after being surprised by a low-flying pelican. He dropped his cellphone, reached to pick it up and drove into the marsh. When police arrived, the car was half-submerged in salt brine.

La Marque, Texas, police lieutenant Greg Gilchrist told the Associated Press that while he didn’t know if the French-made car was salvageable, “Salt water isn’t good for anything.” Smart man, give him a promotion. The pelican got away uninjured.

A week earlier, a couple driving their SUV home from church nearly slammed full speed into an 8-foot elephant crossing U. S. 81 near Enid, Oklahoma. At the last second, the driver swerved and only sideswiped the pachyderm.

The elephant, a 29-year-old female, suffered a broken tusk and leg wounds. The driver and his wife were unhurt. The SUV received shredded sheet metal damage where the elephant’s tusk broke through.

You’re waiting for an explanation as to why an elephant was running loose in central Oklahoma, aren’t you? Actually, it had escaped from a circus in the area. Once it recovers, I’ll bet it won’t try that again.

The website car-accidents.com carries many more stories of car-animal encounters. For instance, a Kansas man driving a Porsche 911 swerved into the oncoming lane to miss a pheasant flying toward his windshield. He hit a one-ton Dodge pickup head-on, fracturing both femurs, his right hip, left fibula, left foot, left radius, left ulna and numerous lesser injuries. The Porsche was ripped into three pieces. The pheasant got away. 

Then there was the English animal-lover who swerved to miss several rabbits in the road. He jumped a curb, demolished a lamp post and tree and rolled down an embankment. The fuel tank in his diesel Citroen burst, drenching him in diesel fuel. He suffered 12 broken ribs, two crushed vertebrae, a punctured lung, numerous internal injuries and various lacerations and bruises. The bunnies hopped away unscathed.

It’s nice to protect the animals, although most experts will tell you it’s safer to hit the animal than swerve. The drivers of the Porsche and Citroen no doubt would have been better off it they had hit the animals. The folks in Oklahoma, though, might have been killed if they hit the elephant head on. 

Sometimes, it’s hard to make that judgment. A few years ago, my sister chose to hit a raccoon in her lane rather than swerve. She was fine, and amazingly, the raccoon ran away to harass motorists another day. Her Mitsubishi Eclipse, on the other hand, suffered over $800 in cosmetic damage.

I think the moral of all this is pretty clear. Park your vehicle in the nearest lot, walk home slowly, and don’t trip over any animals on the way.

  • Front.bridge Cross
    STEP BY STEP—Wyatt Stevens of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge Sunday during the Michigan DNR’s Great Outdoors Jamboree at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The Tecumseh Boy Scout Troop constructed the bridge again this year after taking a break in 2016. The Jamboree offered a variety of activities for a wide range of age groups. Morenci’s Stair District Library set up activities again this year and had visits with dozens of kids. See the back page for additional photos.
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    LEADING THE WAY—The Morenci Area High School marching band led the way across the pedestrian bridge on Morenci’s south side for the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk. The Band Boosters shared profits from the sale of T-shirts with the walk’s sponsor, the Morenci Area Chamber of Commerce. Additional photos are on the back page.
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    LOOKING UP—More than 200 people showed up at Stair District Library Monday afternoon to view the big celestial event with free glasses provided by a grant from the Space Science Institute. The library offered craft activities from noon to 1 p.m., refreshments including Cosmic Cake from Zingerman’s Bakehouse and a live viewing of the eclipse from NASA on a large screen. As the sky darkened slightly, more and more people moved outside to the sidewalk to take a look at the shrinking sun. If you missed it, hang on for the next total eclipse in 2024 as the path comes even closer to this area.
  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
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