2009.07.29 Lots more trash where that one came from

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

I’m sure you noticed in last week’s paper where Mr. Green referred to the sophisticated young buyer of my Slipknot lunch box at the annual Morenci garage sale as a “sucker.” That’s not a nice way to refer to my enlightened customer. Especially after what happened later.

The evening the paper came out, I ran into Sybil Diccion, who said she would have bought the lunch box had she known about it. I doubt that David would call her a sucker. Yet Sybil did resist my counter-offer of a pair of Ozzy Osbourne bobble heads, so she apparently does have limits when it comes to, shall we say, collectibles?

She’s not the only one, since, as already reported, my venture into the annual sale wasn’t particularly successful. And with such fine items, too. It was enough to make me question the dumber man theory.

The “dumber man theory” is my contention that I’m not the dumbest person on earth and I can find another person to buy any collectible item I’ve purchased at a somewhat higher price, or, at least, for what I have invested in it. So, if something appeals to me, I can buy it, secure in the knowledge I can always pass it along to someone else if I tire of it. After the Morenci sale, I’m not that sure anymore.

I would have thought that pillows shaped like Dale Earnhardt’s car would have, excuse me, raced off my table, but no such luck. Some other nearby sellers were doing a bit better.

I watched with interest as Duane Dunbar brought item after item outside his store, including an ancient baseball bat. “Did that used to be Babe Ruth’s?” I asked him. “Could be,” he laughed.

At least I recognized the bat. I saw customers buying stuff from Duane I couldn’t begin to identify. Just a few feet away from me was a bike rack. Probably a dozen people asked me what it was until Duane found a buyer. The dumber man theory was working for him, big time.

What I found fascinating were the dozens of people carrying bags of purchases who walked by without so much as a glance. I can understand if you’re not interested in anything I have, but how do you know that without looking?

Meanwhile,  dozens of diecast cars, trading cards sets and more sat sadly buyerless. Maybe I should have brought along a Kinky Friedman cookbook. Someone might have bit on that. Or a Steve Yzerman rubber duck. Yes, a rubber duck painted to resemble the Detroit Red Wings Hall of Famer.

Or maybe a Pirates of the Caribbean lunch box. Slipknot might be a bit on the edge for some folks, but who doesn’t like Johnny Depp?

By now, my folding chair is starting to get a bit uncomfortable, and I’m considering putting one of the Earnhardt pillows to use. There was a time when Earnhardt items were always the first to sell. Not today.

Finally, a brainstorm hits. I have about 300 rock star trading cards sitting on the table, and so far, no interest in Ozzy, Bruce, Ted, Elvis, the Beatles or anyone else. But when I dig out three Michael Jackson cards and put them out front, they sell almost immediately. I guess I should have asked more for them. Now I’m regretting not bringing my Farrah Fawcett poster, too.

At about 3 p.m., having found a new home for Slipknot, but not much else, I loaded up the Buick and drove over to see how co-worker Kim Ekins and family were doing with their sale. I mentioned that people kept parking in front of me, then disappearing for parts unknown, blocking my display from view of anyone driving by.

Chuck Ekins suggested I should have parked in front of the office myself, then set up my stuff in the space behind my car. Then no one could have missed me. I suppose then I could have held up items within a foot or two of cars as they went by, at least until the first time Larry Weeks drove past.

On the way back to Fayette, I noticed that the Amish folks who run the bake sale at the west edge of Morenci were still set up. They’re lucky. Even if they don’t sell all their items, they can always eat the leftovers. I wouldn’t want to have to eat a Dale Earnhardt pillow.

I wasn’t particularly pleased with the results of my sale, but I have 11 months to decide if I’m going to give it another shot. In the meantime, I’m thinking about talking to Duane Dunbar about that Babe Ruth bat. Do you think he’d trade it for my Three Stooges lunch box? Or should I try to sell that one to Sybil?

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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