The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.04.22 Cigarettes and Texans united to save us $$$$$

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

It seems everywhere I look lately, there’s somebody trying to turn conventional wisdom on its ear. Like the recent news that, contrary to what we’ve heard for years, health care costs for smokers is actually less than those for non-smokers.

Remember all the billions of dollars that the tobacco industry had to, ahem, cough up a few years ago to repay the states for costs attributed to sick smokers? Now, several researchers say it is the non-smoker who really costs the most money for health care.

One study claims that from age 20 on, non-smokers average health care costs total $417,000. For smokers, the amount averages $326,000 per person, a savings of over $90,000 per smoker.

This flies in the face of recent legislation that seeks to give the Food and Drug Administration the power to regulate tobacco products. According to an Associated Press story, proponents of the bill quoted numbers from the Center for Disease Control that say smokers cost the economy $96 billion a year in health care costs.

However, they left out CDC figures that state due to smokers dying sooner than non-smokers, there are huge savings in Medicare, Social Security, pensions and various other programs. Obviously, dying sooner is a bad thing, but if you want to talk about costs, there are unfortunately extra costs involved when a non-smoker lives longer.

“It looks unpleasant or ghoulish to look at the cost savings as well as the cost increases and it’s not a good thing that smoking kills people,” said Vanderbilt University economist Kip Viscusi, “but if you’re going to follow this health-cost train all the way, you have to take into account all the effects, not just the ones you like in terms of getting your bill passed.”

Viscusi has done a study of costs and savings related to smoking and his findings show that for each pack of cigarettes smoked, the country has a net cost savings of 32 cents. A two-pack-a-day smoker would save the country over $230 a year.

Now what happens when the tobacco companies ask for their billions of dollars back? And is it now somehow patriotic to light up? Save the economy, take up smoking?

Come to think of it, President Obama is a smoker. Could he possibly smoke enough to rescue the economy by himself? Not likely. He would need a lot of help. Maybe the nation’s newest Democrat could lend him a hand.

The newest Democrat? That would be a frequent subject of the column you’re reading, namely singer/songwriter/author/ salsa-olive oil-cigar magnate/politician Kinky Friedman.

When last we visited Kinky, he had finished a dismal fourth in his independent campaign for governor of Texas. Since then, he has been pursuing his various business interests and trying to sell an apparently huge leftover inventory of “Kinky in ‘06” merchandise. Now, he’s made a decision on his political future. He’s going to run for Texas governor in 2010 as a Democrat.

Kinky’s announcement makes this sound like the most natural thing to do. His statement included a list of Texas Democrats through history that he admired, including Sam Houston. That’s an interesting choice because during his 2006 campaign, he always referred to Houston as the last independent governor of Texas. Now, he’s become a Democrat overnight, just like Kinky.

A Reader’s Digest profile last year referred to Kinky as “a man of the people—but mostly inebriated people.”  I guess if they’re drunk enough, it won’t matter which party he belongs to. He used to say that the Republicans and Democrats were like paper and plastic. So does that mean he’s now the plastic candidate? Or paper? He never did explain which was which.

Kinky will have to strike up a relationship with President Obama. He’s already friends with Bill Clinton and Bushes 41 and 43. He was also a buddy of John McCain, but Obama stopped him from becoming the fourth Friedman pal in a row in the White House. But now that Kinky’s a Democrat, he has enough in common with the President to start a friendship.

Kinky was born in Chicago, so they have that Illinois connection. Kinky is also famous for smoking cigars and sells his own line of them, so perhaps he could persuade President Obama to switch from cigarettes to “Kinkycristos.” And with both of them smoking cigars, who knows how much in health care costs they can save us?

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