The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

2008.11.19 Watching my life fly past not a big thrill

Written by David Green.


I’ve always wondered what people meant when they said they saw their life flash in front of them in times of possible imminent death. Last Wednesday, I was able to experience the feeling twice in one day, and I’ve learned one thing—I need a more exciting life.

I was on my way to Morenci when my Buick’s front end started vibrating. The farther I went, the worse it got. I considered detouring to the dealership where I purchased it to have the service department take a look, but the vibration, which now had spread to the steering wheel, had gotten so bad, I wondered if I could even make it to the office.

I did make it to the Observer, barely, and called a tow truck to have it hauled to the dealership. The service manager was standing outside when we arrived and took my keys while I went inside to wait for a diagnosis. I probably should have watched them move the car as I missed all the excitement.

A few minutes later, I was enjoying an outdated magazine in the showroom when the salesman who sold me the car walked past and called me “Lucky Foley,” which seemed a bit odd. When he did it a second time, I asked him why and he replied, “You mean they haven’t told you yet?”  When I asked “Told me what?” he explained that a wheel fell off the car as they were driving it inside.

That certainly explained the “lucky” part. Apparently, the lug nuts weren’t properly tightened the previous week when I had someone else at another garage do a brake inspection. One by one, they worked their way off, with the loss of each one making the Buick that much harder to handle. Finally, the last few feet of driving into the service department was enough to cause the loss of a wheel.

We decided that it was good that I hadn’t tried to drive the car there, or that the Observer wasn’t a few blocks farther north. I even made a joke about not having to see my life flash in front of me. But the day wasn’t over yet.

The dealership repaired the car rather quickly and I was soon off to Wauseon to finish my assigned duties. Afterwards, I bought dinner from a drive-through and headed back to Fayette. As I neared the intersection of 20A and 66, I had a vehicle somewhat close behind me so I was watching my rear-view mirror and the road ahead, rather than the road I was turning onto. Big mistake.

I made the turn onto 66 and was faced with a silver car bearing down on me in my lane. I think it was a Chevrolet, but I was too busy steering and swearing at the time to be sure. I managed to get most of the Buick off the road and stopped, while the silver car continued toward me.

It finally slid to a stop no more than two feet away, almost drivers window to drivers window. I rolled mine down while trying to think of something both clever and non-libelous to say. The other car suddenly took off, finally finding the correct lane. I can’t even tell you if the driver was male or female as it seemed to be full of some sort of smoke. Maybe that was their excuse...they couldn’t see where they were going because their ashtray was on fire.

Remembering that bad luck running in three’s superstition, I very carefully watched for hazards on the final seven miles, driving home while weird little film clips of my life ran through my head.

I remember seeing the beheading of my childhood companion Teddy at the hands of my brother, meeting automotive spokeswoman extraordinaire Linda Vaughan at Michigan International Speedway (if you don’t know who she is, the loss is yours), and the night I hit a horse-sized deer with my old Chevy Caprice. And those were the highlights.

Reliving the deer incident got my attention, as there are plenty of them near that stretch of road to be on the lookout for. And the way this day was going, the chance of a stray ghost or two from the partly-demolished Franklin Elementary building making their presence known was certainly possible. Maybe that’s why I couldn’t see a driver in that silver car. It was being driven by ghosts!

Or not. One thing is for sure, though. I’ve got to get a more exciting life. If it’s going to flash in front of me again, at least I should make it something I’m interested in seeing a repeat of. Ghosts and loose wheels need not apply. Linda Vaughan, that’s another story.

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