2008.11.05 A nearly political-free column for your approval

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

While you’re wondering what the results of yesterday’s election will mean for us all, here are a few more pieces of odd trivia I’ve stumbled across recently....

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, over 511,000 people in the United States receive medical treatment for ladder-related injuries each year.

In November, 1926, the ship City of Bangor encountered a powerful ice and snow storm near Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula. The ship, carrying 220 new automobiles, mostly Chryslers, was forced aground off Keweenaw Point. Eighteen cars had already been blown off the ship’s decks into Lake Superior, never to be recovered.

The remaining vehicles, cut free from the ice over the next month or so, were taken to be stored in Copper Harbor. The following March, U.S. 41 was plowed for the first time ever (it took two weeks to clear the road from Copper Harbor to Phoenix, a distance of less than 20 miles) and a parade of the surviving Chryslers began their trip back to Detroit for repairs.

The last privately owned motor vehicle on Mackinac Island was a 1928 Buick. Its owner fought efforts of locals to ban it for several years, finally losing in court and ordered to stop driving it in 1935. He stored it on blocks in his garage for 40 years, before eventually selling it in 1975. It was shipped by barge to St. Ignace.

Also in 1975, a bullet-proof limousine was transported to the island under cover of darkness for the possible use of President Gerald Ford. Secret Service agents demanded that a car be available before the President could visit. Ford used the traditional horse-drawn method of transportation during his stay, and the limo was removed after his departure, again after dark, with few island residents ever aware of the presence of a dreaded motorcar.

Someone must have been in big trouble after over a million copies of Robbie William’s CD “Rudebox” were made but went unsold. I’ll admit it, I never heard of Mr. Williams in the first place, but how can you manufacture over a million more albums than you can sell, no matter who the artist is? That’s just market research at its worst.

I’m even more puzzled by the solution. The unsold CDs are being shipped to China, where they supposedly will be used to pave roads. How exactly they plan to do that may be a subject for a later column.

The first Chevrolet Corvette rolled off the assembly line on June 30, 1953. Or most likely was pushed off, as it refused to start.

The British ship Lusitania, sunk by Germany at the start of World War I, still lies beneath the Atlantic Ocean. Except, that is, for one of its propellers, which was salvaged and made into 3,500 sets of golf clubs.

Seven years after the World Trade Center attacks, the post office next to the attack site still receives about 300 letters a day addressed to offices in one of the towers.

With the survival of the Chrysler Corporation in doubt and the current popularity of alternative fuel vehicles in the marketplace, have they considered a return of the 1964 Chrysler Turbine car? Fifty cars were made at the time for testing purposes, but the car was never put into production. Designed to run on diesel, it turned out that any flammable liquid would power the car without adjustments or problems.

Fuels used at one time or another in the test cars included unleaded gasoline, kerosene, jet fuel, peanut oil, home heating oil, perfume and tequila. 

John Reagan, a former U. S. congressman, was named Postmaster General of the Confederate States of America by Confederate President Jefferson Davis in 1861. Despite functioning in wartime conditions that crippled delivery service, Reagan still managed to eliminate the monetary deficit that existed in Southern postal operations.

Arrested at the end of the war, Reagan was later pardoned and, incredibly, re-elected to the U. S. Congress. There, his postal expertise was recognized when he was named as chairman of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads.

Maybe Reagan should have been put in charge of the Pony Express. With rates as high as $5 for a half-ounce letter when normal U. S. postage was no more than a dime, the Express still lost money and lasted only 18 months.

Famous people who used to work for the Postal Service include Bing Crosby, Walt Disney, Rock Hudson and William Faulkner. But, strangely,  no mention of Newman or Cliff Claven.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
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    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
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    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
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    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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