The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2006.06.21 Unfinished business east and west of the Mississippi

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

Back in March, I made what I thought would be my last trip to St. Louis for my Aunt Sue’s funeral. I took the time to do a few things I’d probably not get another chance to do, but several things were left undone. Now it appears I’ll need to make another trip due to estate matters. Perhaps someone should warn a certain 79-year-old rock legend.

I’ve written before about how Chuck Berry is always appearing at a club a short distance from my aunt’s house the night after I leave town. In March, I figured I would at least try to track down his star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

This time, I found his star easily, and had lunch at the club he plays at. There I learned that he would be appearing the next night, a few hours after Aunt Sue’s memorial service. Although I’m sure she wouldn’t have minded, I passed on Berry’s performance. Now I may get another shot at catching him. Heck, he’s turning 80 this year, can he stay one step ahead of me forever?

I also missed folk/rock/country singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams, appearing the same night at another club just a few blocks from Berry. That might be a bigger tragedy than missing Chuck as I’m sure the Louisiana native doesn’t come to St. Louis that often. Maybe they can book Lucinda at the Fayette Opera House some time.

There’s also a club across the Mississippi in Collinsville, Ill., called Wild Country that runs an interesting ad in the St. Louis entertainment weekly. Instead of giving their address, the ad says “If you can’t find it...You’re too stupid to be here!” Their other slogan is “18 to get in, 21 to get plastered.”

Perhaps I’d better just drink at Aunt Sue’s house. In March, my sister was puzzled by the can of Mountain Dew she found in her refrigerator, knowing Aunt Sue wouldn’t have bought it. I solved that mystery, telling her I had left a can behind the previous November. Expecting me back for her 100th birthday this year, Aunt Sue had saved it for me.

Once, Aunt Sue had given me a Diet Coke that tasted even stranger than usual. After finally finishing it, I checked the expiration date—about seven months past expiration. Compared to that, the barely-expired Dew tasted as good as fresh.

And since Aunt Sue won’t be around next trip to cook, instead of going to a conventional restaurant, a short trip across the river to Sauget, Ill., may be in order. Sauget is home to the Gateway Grizzlies of the Frontier League. Unlike the nearby St. Louis Cardinals, the minor-league Grizzlies concession stand items include a hamburger served on a Krispy Kreme doughnut bun. Mmmm, doughnut burgers!

And finally, I have a real need to make a return visit to a certain motel in Cloverdale, Ind. I stayed there last November and was unable to close one side of the window drapes. I finally lifted up part of the drapes on the broken side and used the floor lamp to keep it held up against the window.

Later that night, I kept having trouble with the television remote. It became obvious that the batteries were going dead as I kept having to get closer and closer to change channels or adjust the volume. When I was finally ready to turn the television off, the remote wouldn’t work at all. Since there was no on/off switch on the set itself, I had to unplug the television to shut it off.

The next morning, I discovered the hair dryer in the room didn’t work, either. Rather than make three complaints I only told them about the drapes, figuring the next person would complain about the television and dryer. The desk clerk said she’d alert the repairman.

Four months later, I again stopped for the night in Cloverdale and decided to stay at the same motel. Even though they must have more than 100 rooms, they assigned me to the same one I stayed at before. I was sure it was the same one even before I went in, but the fact that the drapes still didn’t work was the proof. The hair dryer was still broken, too, but at least they had fixed the remote.

Now I know what’s most important to motel customers. Or maybe the repairman is only qualified to change batteries. But I’m going to be prepared if I end up in the same room again. This time, I’m taking along a tarp and a roll of duct tape. Better safe than sorry.

– June 21, 2006

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