2008.10.22 A few hours of fall fun in the Thumb

Written by David Green.

By RICH FOLEY

Don’t you hate being on vacation and passing by some little attraction, wondering if you should turn around and go back to visit? Obviously, you can’t indulge every such impulse, but I spent last weekend backtracking to something I missed over 10 years ago.

In May of 1996, I was driving through Lexington, Mich., near the end of a trip through the state’s Thumb region when my companion spotted a business called Foley’s Market. We agreed we should stop to look for souvenirs, but the Ford Aerostar I was driving lacked working turn signals and we were being followed by a state police cruiser.

Rather than risking getting a ticket as a memento, I decided to wait until the trooper made his own turn. Unfortunately, he tailed us for six or seven miles before passing and we decided to continue on instead of returning to town. Last weekend, I got another chance.

This time, I got to play navigator as a friend invited me on a fall color tour. Since she wanted to drive her new pickup and had never been to the Thumb, I got to sit back, scan the state map and direct our travels. I had checked online and found Foley’s Market still existed (although not owned by someone named Foley) and it was added to the must-see list.

Once we got on U.S. 23 and headed north, we quickly found we could have filled the truck with dead deer as a remembrance of our travels. I should have kept an accurate count, but I’d guess 30 carcasses to be close.

Once we got off I-69 and headed cross-country to Lexington, the scenery got a bit more interesting. In Yale, I was intrigued by the sight of School Place Apartments, a former school converted into an apartment complex for those not wanting to “graduate” to a house, I would guess. East of Peck, my chauffeur spotted several buffalo in a field. This trip, we turned around and went back so I could see them.

We made it to Lexington and Foley’s Market, but you’ll have to take my word for that. For a business in a tourist area, I was amazed that they had nothing available for sale with their name on it. No T-shirts or caps. No travel mugs. No cheap trinkets. Not even a grocery sack. I bought a few snacks and didn’t even get their name on a receipt. We discussed taking a photo, but since neither of us brought a camera, we thought it wasn’t worth buying a travel camera just for that.

Some people wouldn’t agree. A few miles north of Port Sanilac, a man on a bicycle we had recently passed pulled up to us at a rest stop along Lake Huron. He said he was taking photos of town water towers along the path of his trip to prove where he had been and asked if we would take a picture of him standing in front of the lake with an ore boat in the distance.

He seemed quite happy to get the photo. A few more miles to the north, we went by a really neat lighthouse. I hope he found someone to take his photo there, too.

We stopped for dinner at a café in Port Austin near the tip of the Thumb and got a lot more than we bargained for. The waitress took our order, went in the kitchen for a minute, then outside and brought in the “open” sign. We asked if we had came in late, but she said it was about 15 minutes until closing and she was just getting ready. Up until then she had been pretty quiet, but that set her off.

She proceeded to tell us the history of the restaurant (she was the owner’s daughter as well as cook, waitress and bus girl on this particular night), all about her family and quite a bit about running a business in a tourist town. She even managed to fit it a few stories about several vehicles she had owned. For someone who had already put in a 12 hour day, she seemed in no hurry to send us on our way. She even sold me some vintage Coke glasses as a keepsake of our visit.

Unable to sleep well after the excitement of the day, I went to our motel’s continental breakfast shortly after its 6 a.m. opening. They even had a computer with internet access available to guests. Armed with a bagel and orange juice, I checked my email at 6:15 a.m. That made it official. This little journey was almost over.

From Bay City back home was all main roads with not much to do but grieve for the dead deer along the way. At least this trip didn’t leave me with that feeling that I missed out on something. I wouldn’t, however, mind going back to Port Austin some day. I’d bet that waitress still has some stories I haven’t heard.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
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  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.

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